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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Preface
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Submissions for Publication
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Call for Papers
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Martin X. Moleski Minutes of Polanyi Society Meeting of November 21, 1998
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5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Éva Gábor Michael Polanyi And The Liberal Philosophical Tradition In Hungary
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This essay describes the Hungarian historical background out of which Michael Polanyi’s lifelong commitment to a liberal, democratic form of government grew. Hungary’s liberal thinkers blossomed in the nineteenth centruy, but their orientation was more political and practical than philosophical. Enlightenment ideas did not penetrate deeply into Hungarian society, which in recent centuries was hampered by its Eastern European and feudal ties. Thus Polanyi felt he had to move to more liberal countries.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Dale Cannon A Polanyian Approach To Conceiving And Teaching Introduction To Philosophy
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This paper represents one attempt to implement a post-critical approach to teaching introduction to philosophy, in contrast with the usual approach which serves to re-establish the critical paradigm that Polanyi’s “post-critical philosophy” is meant to challenge and displace. It aims to have students discover their own fiduciary access to reality and rely upon it while slowly building competence in critical analysis of the principal intellectual options in the history of philosophy.
7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
David W. Rutledge “Beyond Logic and Beneath Will”: Teaching in a Polanyian Spirit
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Crucial to teaching Polanyi is an appreciation of his post-critical position outside of usual philosophy of science debates. He is especially useful in introducing students to religion & science debates (esp. Science, Faith and Society), because he struggled out of a critical dilemma similar to theirs. Polanyi’s work has unusual moral and historical dimensions;Science, Faith and Society anticipates, in accessible form, many of his later arguments. A class mirroring Polanyian concerns will be communal, dialectical, and personal, in a combination which helps students find their own voice.
9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
D. M. Yeager Reclaiming “Science as a Vocation”: Learning as Self-Destruction; Teaching as Self-Restraint
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Working from an integration of Michael Polanyi‘s image of learning as self-destruction and Max Weber’s analysis of the ethics of scholarship, the author explores the implications of Polanyi’s argument concerning “the depth to which the . . . person is involved even in . . . an elementary heuristic effort” (367). In the process, the author raises questions about current expectations concerning faculty “performance” and current methods of assessing faculty success in the classroom.
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 2
Information on WWW Polanyi Resources
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