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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Preface
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
News and Notes
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
Polanyi’s Post-Critical Thought and the Rebirth of Meaning: Call for Papers—June 8-10, 2001 Conference
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
Upcoming November 2000 Polanyi Society Meeting in Nashville
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5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
Andy F. Sanders Polanyians on Realism: an Introduction
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This introduction to a special Tradition and Discovery issue on Polanyi’s realism summarizes, and comments on the views of Jha, Gulick, Mullins, Cannon, Puddefoot, Meek and Sanders. All agree that Polanyi advocated a scientific realism hanging on the theses that reality is independent of human conceptualizations and that it is partially and fallibly knowable. Major differences concern its scope. All agree that it is comprehensive, pertaining not only to common sense and science but to intrinsic and ultimate values, and perhaps the divine realities as well. Whereas Jha and Gulick argue a more limited scope, others defend a Polanyian position by drawing in various ways on the personal (Cannon) and social (Mullins, Sanders, Puddefoot) coefficients of the practice of inquiry. The debates show clearly that the relationship between Polanyi’s epistemology, axiology and hermeneutics deserve further scrutiny.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
S. R. Jha Polanyi’s Problematic ‘Man in Thought’: the Tacit and the Real – an Exploration and a Critique
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Polanyi’s philosophy of “man in thought,” by all appearances, chronologically and structurally, seems to be founded on his epistemology. Polanyi’s epistemology of tacit knowing as integration is teleological. By his “ontological equation,” he patterned comprehensive (and complex) entities as emergence on his epistemology. This forces him to make puzzling formulaic statements which land him in trouble with fellow scientists. The equation also lends itself to unwarranted problematic interpretations. The exploration leads me to suggest that Polanyi may be understood as a “rational realist” who insisted on a tacit knowledge version of interactionist mode of mind-body relation.
7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
Walter B. Gulick Beyond Epistemology to Realms of Meaning
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Ultimately Michael Polanyi moved from theorizing about reality in terms of three overlapping frameworks of analysis (personal knowing, evolution/ecology, and tacit knowing) to a yet more comprehensive framework of interpretation: meaning construction. An analysis of the dimensions of embodied, symbol drenched meaning construction suggests that the modernist tendency to tether reality to epistemological analysis be replaced by an exploration of three interpenetrating ontological regions: experiences of existential meaning, cultural forms of meaning, and external reality. In support of this view, I make reference to earlier expressions of my work, utilize illustrations from philosophical history, and address comments from my critics.
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
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9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins The Real As Meaningful
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This essay examines Michael Polanyi’s comments about “reality” over a forty year career and argues that there are many nuances. However, Polanyi is a peculiar kind of philosophical realist, a participative realist. There are polyvalent and a bodily aspects of Polanyi’s realism. Against Walter Gulick’s criticisms of Polanyi, I contend that a strong distinction between reality and meaning is not warranted.
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 26 > Issue: 3
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