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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Preface
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
News and Notes
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Information on Electronic Discussion Group
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
2003 Polanyi Society Annual Meeting Program
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5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Philip Rolnick Regarding Philip Clayton
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This brief opening for a special issue of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical on Philip Clayton’s thought and its connection with that of Michael Polany introduces Clayton’s essay and the responses by Martinez Hewlett, Gregory R. Peterson, Andy F. Sanders and Waler B. Gulick.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Philip Clayton--Biographical Sketch
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7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Philip Clayton Emergence, Supervenience, and Personal Knowledge
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Michael Polanyi was perhaps the most important emergence theorist of the middle of the 20th century. As the key link between the British Emergentists of the 1920s and the explosion of emergence theory in the 1990s, he played a crucial role in resisting reductionist interpretations of science and keeping the concept of emergence alive. Polanyi’s position on emergence is described and its major strengths and weaknesses are analyzed. Using Polanyi as the foundation, the article surveys the major contemporary options in thephilosophy of mind and defends a particular understanding of the relationship of mental properties to brain states.
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Martinez Hewlett On Polanyi, Clayton, and Biology: Some Musings of a Recovering Reductionist
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Michael Polanyi critiqued the then burgeoning field of molecular biology and the neo-Darwinian synthesis that has since come to characterize the structure of modern biology. He pointed out correctly that the reductionistic approach lacked explanatory power in the case of living systems. Philip Clayton addresses the importance of Polanyi’s thinking, even though it was not appreciated at the time it was presented. He argues, however, that while some aspects of Polanyi’s biological perspective are important in considering emergent phenomenon, other ideas are less well received in the modern era. This article discusses the pros and cons of the Clayton view and presents a model for a biological structure that might embrace emergence and supervenience
9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Gregory R. Peterson Emergence and Supervenience: A Reply to Philip Clayton
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Philip Clayton has put forth a clear and important position regarding the mind-body relationship in terms of supervenient and emergent realities. While I agree with Clayton on many points, I argue that there are important problems with current literature on supervenience and emergence. In particular, I distinguish between closed system emergence and open system emergence, suggesting that Clayton’s position is closer to the latter than the former.
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Submissions for Publication
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11. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Andy F. Sanders God, Contemporary Science and Metaphysics: A Response to Philip D. Clayton
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This paper is a response read at a joint session of the Polanyi Society and the Religion and Science Group at the AAR Annual Meeting in Denver, November 16, 2001. Though a paradigm example of the conversation between systematic theology and contemporary science, Philip Clayton’s God and Contemporary Science is questioned for taking the natural sciences too seriously: it endangers the autonomy of theology and by implicitly advocating a grand metaphysics, it creates an unbridgeable gap with ordinary religious meaning, and in regard to some theological doctrines, with science as well.
12. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Walter B. Gulick Response to Clayton: Taxonomy of the Types and Orders of Emergence
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Inappropriately reductive or deterministic appropriations of science haunt Philip Clayton’s otherwise instructive appropriation of Michael Polanyi’s thought for theological and ethical reflection. The work at hand utilizes contemporary complexity theory to augment Polanyi’s notions of emergence and hierarchy and to provide a vision within which moral responsibility and theological inquiry make sense. It sets forth types and orders of emergence that bypass untenable notions of causality, reducibility, and determinism.
13. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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14. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Philip Clayton Emergence — A Response to My Critics
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The author responds to criticisms from the four respondents to his “Emergence, Supervenience, and Personal Knowledge,” acknowledging areas where their points have improved the interpretation of science and the interpretation of Polanyi. The discussion focuses on the extent of the “causal decoupling” between parts and emergent wholes, with special attention to the question of whether (and if so, to what degree) brain activity causes thought.
15. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Information on WWW Polanyi Resources
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reviews
16. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Curtis L. Thompson The Problem of God in Modern Thought
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17. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 3
Polanyi Society Membership
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18. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Preface
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19. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
News and Notes
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20. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Information on Electronic Discussion Group
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