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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Preface
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
News and Notes
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
2010 Polanyi Society Annual Meeting in Atlanta
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Michael Polanyi Persons
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This text is the seventh of an eight-lecture series given by Michael Polanyi at the University of Chicago in the spring of 1954. The lecture focuses on the nature of human knowledge of other living beings.
5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Jay A. Labinger Individual or Institutional Authority in Science?
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This book discussion focuses on Theodore L. Brown’s Imperfect Oracle. Richard Moodey, a sociologist, and Jay Labinger, a scientist, raise questions about some of Brown’s views on the epistemic and moral authority of science and Brown responds.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Richard Moodey Institutional Science as Person or Network?
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7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Ted Brown Author’s Response to Jay Labinger and Richard Moodey
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8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
WWW Polanyi Resources
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9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Andrew Grosso Incommunicability, Relationality, and Self- Donation: Philip Rolnick on Persons Divine and Human
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This article is a discussion of Philip A. Rolnick’s Person, Grace, and God with comments by Andrew Grosso, Paul Lewis and Paul Gavrilyuk and a response by Philip Rolnick.
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis Do We Need to Go Through Trinity to Relate Person, Grace, and God?
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11. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Paul L. Gavrilyuk Rolnick on the Metaphysics of the Person
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12. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Philip Rolnick Responses to Responses to Person, Grace, and God
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13. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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14. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Charles Lowney Morality: Emergentist Ethics and Virtue For Itself
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New moral ways of being are answers to fundamental problems in the human condition regarding the best way to be and the best way to be with each other. Entering a new way of being entails crossing a logical gap into a new interpretive framework. Michael Polanyi’s from-to structure of knowing and discovery is used to show both how we can acquire the state of the good person through an imitation of their behaviors and why those behaviors must be practiced for themselves. The good person experiences a happiness that the person pursuing happiness as a goal cannot fully understand. One thus practices virtues, and heeds their codification into law, not for the sake of one’s own happiness, but for the sake of the happiness of the person one will become.
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15. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis The Ethical Brain: the Science of Our Moral Dilemmas
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16. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Paul Knepper Double Exile: Migrations of Jewish-Hungarian Professionals through Germany to the United States, 1919-1945
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17. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins The Moot Papers, Faith, Freedom and Society, 1938-1947
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18. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Preface
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19. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 2
News and Notes
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20. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 36 > Issue: 2
Struan Jacobs Tradition in a Free Society: The Fideism of Michael Polanyi and the Rationalism of Karl Popper
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Michael Polanyi and Karl Popper offer contrasting accounts of social tradition. Popper is steeped in the heritage of the Enlightenment, while Polanyi interweaves religious and diverse secular strands of thought. Explaining the liberal tradition, Polanyi features tacit knowledge of rules, standards, applications and interpretations being transmitted by “craftsmen” to “apprentices.” Each generation adopts the liberal tradition on “faith,” commits to creatively developing its art of knowledge-in-practice, and is drawn to the spiritual reality of ideal ends. Of particular interest to Popper is the rationality of social traditions. Likened by him to scientific theories, Popper’s traditions are criticizable and improvable, assisting agents to understand, and act in, the world as stable and predictable. Polanyi’s is the more informative rendering of tradition. Polanyi delves deeply into important areas where Popper only scratches their surface: the tacit dimension, transmission by way of apprenticeship, the meaning of tradition for those who participate in it, and the extent of its authority over them.