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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Preface
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
News and Notes
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
2011 Polanyi Society Annual Meeting Program
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Update on Polanyi Society Loyola Conference
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5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
David Rutledge An Open Letter Soliciting Financial Support For The Polanyi Society
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6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Connections/Disconnections: Polanyi and Contemporary Concerns and Domains of Inquiry
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7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Notes on Contributors
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8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Stephen G. Henry A Clinical Perspective on Tacit Knowledge and Its Varieties
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Harry Collins’ book Tacit and Explicit Knowledge seeks to clarify the concept of tacit knowledge made famous by Michael Polanyi. Collins’ tripartite taxonomy of tacit knowledge is explained using illustrative examples from clinical medicine. Collins focuses on distinguishing the kinds of tacit knowledge that can (in principle) be made wholly explicit from the kinds of tacit knowledge that are inescapably tacit. Polanyi’s writings, on the other hand, emphasize the process of tacit knowing. Collins’ investigation of tacit knowledge makes an important scholarly contribution that is distinct from and complementary to investigations that focus on tacit knowing.
9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Charles Lowney Ineffable, Tacit, Explicable and Explicit: Qualifying Knowledge in the Age of “Intelligent” Machines
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Harry Collins’ Tacit and Explicit Knowledge is engaged to clarify and expand the notions of tacit and explicit. A broader continuum for tacit knowledge and its indirectly or only partially explicable components is provided by complementing Collins’ exposition of tacit knowledge with a discussion of formal systems and Polanyi’s exposition of tacit knowing. Support is provided for Collins’ distinction between strings and language, mechanical modeling as a form of explication, and the notion that machines lack tacit knowledge and language. While Collins emphasizes the inexplicability of cultural fluency as tacit knowledge, Polanyi emphasizes the functional dimension of skillful performances. The conceptual strengths and weaknesses of Collins’ and Polanyi’s approaches are examined. Collins’ emphasis on string transformation and his division of tacit knowing into Relational (RTK), Somatic (STK), and Collective (CTK) are helpful tools, but should not flatten Polanyi’s multiple levels of knowing and being into a dualism that may encourage reductionism.
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Harry Collins Analysing Tacit Knowledge: Response to Henry and Lowney
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I respond to the reviews by Henry and Lowney of my book Tacit and Explicit Knowledge. I stress the need to understand explicit knowledge if tacit knowledge is to be understood. Tacit knowledge must be divided into three kinds: relational, somatic and collective. The idea of relational tacit knowledge is keyto pulling the three kinds apart.