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journal and society information
1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Notes on Contributors
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reflections on the limits of liberalism
3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Will R. Jordan Land of the Lost
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Matthew D. Sandwisch Recovering Tradition
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5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Colin Cordner Tradition and Recollection
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6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Mark T. Mitchell Response
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essays
7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Jean-Baptiste Lamarche On the Clandestine Moral Order Embodied in Psychoanalytic Explanations of Actions
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In many contemporary societies, multitudes have used and are still using psychoanalysis to account for their actions to one another, by attributing to them repressed motives as their causes. The significance of this wide metaclinical use of psychoanalysis remains deeply misunderstood, as searchers predominantly treat psychoanalysis as a pure theory (despite the fact that it transformed social interactions), or as an asocial procedure, achieved by individuals escaping the moral requirements of society. To correct our vision of psychoanalysis, I rely on Michael Polanyi’s analysis of moral inversion and Charles W. Mills’ sketch of a psychoanalytic vocabulary of motives. An analysis of Freud’s theory of repression benefitting from those complementary insights shows that it allows contemporaries to assert backhandedly and indirectly their commitment to the cardinal values of an emerging individualist society.
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Lindsay Atnip From “Meaning” to Reality: Toward a Polanyian Cognitive Theory of Literature
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This essay articulates a theory and practice of “reading toward reality” based on Polanyi’s conception of scientific discovery as proceeding from the apprehension of problems, guided by our tacit intimations of a new coherence that would resolve these problems, and a reality as the condition of such inquiry. I argue that, analogously, (good) literature poses problems of sense that refer us to our own tacit knowledge of the normative conditions of sense—conditions which underlie and sometimes contradict our conventional modes of sensemaking. Literature thus can educate us to those human realities which underlie our everyday social world and to the conditions by which we might more adequately judge and make sense of our experience.
9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Walter Gulick Forms of Emergence
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In this essay I seek to clarify the unruly notion of emergence by describing three distinct varieties. I suggest that it is often fruitful to ascertain whether what emerges is an aspect of the physical world or a matter of novel meaning rather than quibble over whether emergence is an epistemological construct or is ontological in nature.