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journal and society information
1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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james e. loder and michael polanyi
2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Notes on Contributors
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on william h. poteat
3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Dale Cannon, Introduction to Poteat and Polanyi III
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
David H. Nikkel, Curing Dualistic, Disembodied Patterns of Thinking in the Academy
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This essay develops aspects and implications of Poteat’s critique of the Enlightenment’s critical paradigm and development of post-critical thinking in dialogue with Pascal in his dissertation and four post-critical thinkers who figured prominently in his project: Kierkegaard, Merleau-Ponty, Wittgenstein, and Polanyi. Then it critiques from a Poteatian perspective the critical, dualistic, discarnate picture that still dominates the academy, especially attending to the cognitive science of religion. CSR involves both a reductive physicalism involving unconscious mental mechanisms and a re-inscribing of subjectivistic or mentalist (alleged) beliefs in disembodied supernatural and human spirits.
5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Murray Jardine, The Political Implications of William H. Poteat’s Philosophy
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Since World War II, political theory has increasingly focused on the question of the origins and nature of the modern age. William H. Poteat’s explication of the Greek and Hebraic ontologies and his argument that modernity is the result of their incoherent combination in Christian theology can provide a framework to synthesize and extend the major competing theories about the modern era.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Elon G. (Jerry) Eidenier, Six Poems
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on epistemology
7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Mihály Héder, Daniel Paksi, Non-Human Knowledge According to Michael Polanyi
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Three recent interpreters of tacit knowledge, Harald Grimen, Harry Collins, and John McDowell, either deny it is appropriate to attribute knowledge of any sort to animals or ignore the relevance of the tacit knowledge of animals to human knowledge. In this article, we seek to show that in Michael Polanyi’s understanding, tacit knowledge in animals underlies and supports human explicit knowledge. For Polanyi, tacit knowledge arises in increasingly complex forms in evolutionary history, and explicit knowledge emerges from it. Both forms of knowledge are personal achievements that can be true or false; animal behavior is not simply deterministic. Polanyi’s view on non-human tacit knowledge thus explains features of human knowledge that those denying or ignoring non-human knowledge leave unexplained.
journal and society information
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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engagements with retrieving realism by herbert dreyfus and charles taylor
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
John V. Apczynski, A Polanyian Epistemology Manqué: Reflections on Retrieving Realism
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These reflections attempt to clarify and strengthen Dreyfus and Taylor’s defense of a realist understanding of knowing by comparing it to features of Michael Polanyi’s theory of personal knowledge. I believe this overcomes some ambiguities such as their use of “mediation” and strengthens their case in discussing science without recourse to the notion of a “view from nowhere.” These in turn provide a more robust understanding of their understanding of realism within a pluralist framework. For students of Polanyi’s thought, this comparative effort provides an opportunity to place Polanyi’s theory within the wider world of contemporary philosophical thinking that they bring to their exposition of a “contact” theory of knowing. This might provide a basis for developing Polanyi’s thought through these contemporary channels.