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Displaying: 1-10 of 907 documents


thinking in stories
1. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Peter Shea Thirteen Reasons Why
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reflection
2. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Chiara Chiapperini, Walter Kohan, Jason Wozniak An Interview with Walter Kohan
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3. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Mor Yorshansky Students’ Meaning of Power: A Challenge to Philosophy for Children as a Practice of Democratic Education
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A classroom Community of Inquiry depends on the deliberation skills of its members and their willingness to share ideas, time and power, despite conflicting interests, in the process of social inquiry. This vision of sharing power is not without challenges to both P4C and other theoretical movements within the discourse of democratic education. The kind of theorizing that is missing should explore students’ perceptions, judgment, decision making, agency and the like, through meaning making in particular contexts of democratic education. To explore such challenges, I designed a qualitative study to unfold the meanings of power that middle school students constructed within a learning environment, which was influenced by democratic education principles. In explaining their meanings of power in democratic education, the participants explicitly challenged the pre-set notion of power equality between teachers and students, and between the members of a CI, and also the foundational concept of power that is based on redistribution of time and ideas. Arendt’s view of power mirrors the students’ perspectives. This notion of power in education explains why the students supported the teachers’ ‘power’, and why students used their power to different degrees. It is the way Arendt “stylized the image of the Greek polis to the essence of politics as such” (Habermas, 1986, p.82; Arendt, 1986, p.62) that explains how power should support democratic education according to the youths’ view.
4. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Darren Garside Using Rorty to Consider the Future of P4C
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5. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Janette Poulton Is There Any Future for P4C in Australia?
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The future of Philosophy for Children depends upon at least two factors: shared values with the educational policies of the society in question, and valid and user-friendly tools for monitoring growth in this area. As teachers internalise the requirements of the Victorian Education system policy statements, the use of the pedagogy of the Community of Inquiry, P4C is being recognised as a particularly powerful tool for delivering the outcomes. In addition, appropriate tools for curriculum development, and for the assessment and monitoring of student progress (as critical, creative and caring thinkers) are being developed and circulated within the Department of Education. Thus we proceed with optimism and confidence
6. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Roger Sutcliffe Towards a Kinder Philosophy
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This paper supports Dewey’s call for the ‘recovery’ of philosophy as a practice addressing the ordinary problems of humans. It suggests that Lipman’s development of communities of philosophical inquiry, and particularly his emphasis on caring thinking, have helped considerably towards this recovery – rendering philosophy ‘kinder’ or more compassionate in its tone. But it argues that there has to be an equal emphasis on collaborative, or dialogical, thinking. Without that drive towards mutual understanding and the common good, philosophy as a practice can easily become too narrowly critical, or too broadly sentimental. We must think together, or we shall die apart.
notes from the field
7. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Rob Bartels, Jeroen Onstenk P4D: Philosophy and Democracy in the Classroom
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8. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Eva Marsal, Takara Dobashi Death in Children’s Construction of the World: A German-Japanese Comparison with Gender Analysis
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9. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Maria Figueiroa-Rego Building on Lipman’s Legacy: The Creation of a Portuguese P4C Curriculum
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To what extent can Lipman’s P4C materials be universally applied? The Portuguese Curriculum on Philosophy with Children and Youth is designed as an answer to this question. A number of difficulties arise in translating these IAPC materials. In linguistic terms – and generally speaking – it is may be an easy, simple task to translate from one language to another, but how is it possible to translate cultural contexts? Ordinary practices within a given culture may be seen as odd or even absurd to another. In such cases, the text remains distant to the reader hindering his/her empathy with the characters in the story.
10. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Larisa Retyunskikh Russian Realities of P4C
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The article deals with the problems, troubles and successes of P4C in Russia. There is a description of the first steps of it, contemporary situation, and author’s reasoning about it through the discussion with opponents. P4C in Russia started from the meeting of Nina Yulina and Matthew Lipman more then 20 years ago.