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seccion monografica: el significado y sus límites (meaning and its limits)
1. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Manuel Hernández Iglesias Presentacion
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2. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Óscar Cabaco Convencionalidad y Significado Sin Uso
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One of the main problems of Lewis' approach to the conventionality of language is the so-called "probLem of the meaning without we ". In this paper consider the possible solutions to this problem and conclude that in order to avoid this objection Lewis' proposal must be substantially modified.
3. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Esther Romero, Belén Soria La Metonimia Referencial
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In most of the proposals about metonymy it is argued that it is a figure of signification or trope that exploits a figurative or transferred meaning. These proposals lose sight of what the examples that we normally consider metonymy have in common, to wit, that they are understood if we complete the metonymic noun phrase and not if we substitute it by another. It is in this sense that we understand that referential metonymy is a case of ellipsis and, thus, a figure of language or scheme whose mechanism of interpretation is intimately related to the mechanism of retrieval of expressions.
4. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Manuel Perez Otero Aplicaciones Filosoficas Del Bi-Dimensionalismo: Modalidad y Contenido Epistemico
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Kripke argued for the existence of necessary a posteriori truths, and tried to explain why some of them seem to be contingent. His main explanation motivated two philosophical proposals: (i) the attempt - linked to some interpretations of two-dimensionalism - to analyse the epistemic concept of a priori truth using metaphysical modal concepts; (ii) the argument for psychophysical dualism worked out by Kripke relying on his explanation of the appearances of contingency. I point out several difficulties for (i), and argue that (ii) can oe blocked because of the existence of alternative accounts of the phenomenon.
5. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Neftalí Villanueva Sustitutividad e Implicaturas Conversacionales
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The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the Implicature Theory for epistemic contexts, as an attempt to save the validity of the Principle of Substitution in those contexts. I defend that Recanati 's arguments against the Implicature Theory are not conclusive because they are based on inadequate examples and on unclear interpretations of Grice's writings. I then argue that the mixing up of theories of meaning and attitude ascription with the classical intuitions held by Fregeans against Russellians in these contexts does not give promising results.
6. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Josep Macià Presuposicion Y Significado Expresivo
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Presuppositions are well known phenomena. One way of treating them is as partial 'meaning-functions '. There is an attractive argument that holds that in order to explain the contrast between such sentences as "John came into the room" and "That bastard John came into the room" it is required to make our semantic theory essentially more complex. This argument appeals to the fact that contrasts such as the ones just mentioned play a role in the validity of logical inferences. In this paper I argue that these contrasts can be accounted for by appealing to presuppositions. In order to defend this view we will have to offer a characterization of logical consequence that applies to sentences that involve presuppositions.
articulos / articles
7. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Pilar Castrillo La Implicacion y la Filosofia de la Logica en Peirce
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Peirce claims that there is but one primary logical relation, that of illation or logical consequence. The present paper is devoted to show the influence of this viewpoint in Peirce's conception of logic. After a brief presentation of Peirce's membership in the tradition of language as calculus, it examines his pioneering work in modal logic and other systems of logic. The last section attemps to summarize his doctrine of logic as a normative science.
8. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
José Tomás Alvarado El Argumento de Teoria de Modelos de Putnam y la Metodologia para la Comprension de las Nociones Intencionales
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Putnam's Model- Theoretic Argument has been generally held as invalid. In this work, attention is addressed to two broad facts understated by critics and commentators: (i) there are, at least, two different model-theoretic arguments. One is directed against realism and the other is directed to naturalistic semantics. The general rejection affects the former, but it is open to discussion if it affects the latter; (ii) on the other hand, the model-theoretic argument construed as a reductio argument has not - prima facia - ontological consequences, but only restrains our methodology to deal with the intentional realm.
9. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Agustín Vicente The Localism of the Conserved Quantity Theory
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Phil Dowe has argued persuasively for a reductivist theory of causality. Drawing on Wesley Salmon's mark transmission theory and David Fair's transferencetheory, Dowe proposes to reduce causality to the exchange of conserved quantities. Dowe's account has the virtue of being simple and offering a definite "visible" idea of causation. According to Dowe and Salmon, it is also virtuous in being localist. That a theory of causation is localist means that it does not need the aid of counterfactuals and/or laws to work. Moreover, it can become the means by which we explain counterfactuals and laws. In this paper, I will argue that the theory is not localist (and hence, that it is less simple than it seems). As far as I can see, the theory needs the aid of laws.
in memoriam
10. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Magí Cadevall Stephen Jay Gould
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recensiones / book reviews
11. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Lucila Gonzalez Pazos Filosofia actual de la mente
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12. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Antonio Dieguez Who Rules in Science? An Opinionated Guide to the Wars
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13. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Libros Recibidos / Book Received
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cronicas y proximas reuniones / notices and announcements
14. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Agenda / Notebook
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15. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 3
Issue Summary
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seccion monografica: theoria experimentorum
16. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
José Ferreiros, Javier Ordoñez Presentacion: Hacia Una Filosofia De La Experimentacion
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17. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Allan Franklin Fisica y Experimentacion
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In this paper I examine the roles that experiment plays in science. Experiment can test theories, but it can also call for a new theory. Experiment can also provide hints about the mathematical form of a theory. Likewise it can provide evidence for the existence of the entities involved in our theories. Finally, it may also have a life of its own, independent of theory. I will illustrate these roles using episodes from the history of contemporary physics. I will also discuss an epistemology of experiment, a set of strategies that provides grounds for reasonable belief in experimental results.
18. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Jed Z. Buchwald Notas Sobre Conocimiento Inarticulado, Experimentacion Y Traduccion
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Debate among scientists is frequently hampered by intense difficulties in communicating and translating their viewpoints. This well-known fact illustrates the role of unarticulated core knowledge in the activities of sientific communities. But it has been little noticed that the issue afficts not just written science, but especially traditions of experimental activity and their products, including instruments and techniques. The question is addressed on the basis of examples from the history of optics and electromagnetism - Fresnel and Brewster, Maxwell and Hertz - and texts from Kuhn's Structure. Particular attention is paid to interrelations between succeeding theories, and to the notorious problem of theory-choice.
19. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
María Jesús Santesmases ¿Artificio O Naturaleza? Los Experimentos En La Historia De La Biologia
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We study twentieth-century biological sciences as experimental sciences by historically reconstructing the uses of experiments. Concepts like artificial, natural, and inventions, are handled so as to show how much current biological thought has been constructed on the basis of the invention of different kinds of experiments, instruments, and technical devices, experimental systems, and ideas concerning the fonctioning of nature. It is suggested that the frontier that may separate the natural from the artificial has already been crossed. Human intervention in the natural phenomena through reproducible experiments hints to a view of current biological knowledge as a permanent invention of nature.
20. Theoria. Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Friedrich Steinle Challenging Established Concepts: Ampère and Exploratory Experimentation
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The more unknowns there are and the newer a field of research is, the less well defined are the experiments. Once a field has been sufficiently worked over so that the possible conclusions are more or less limited to existence or nonexistence, and perhaps to quantitative determination, the experiments will become increasingly better defined. But they will no longer be independent, because they are carried along by a system of earlier experiments and decisions, which is generally the situation in physics and chemistry today. Such a system will then become self-evident know-how itself. We will no longer be aware of its application and effect (Fleck 1935 (1980), p. 114, translation slightly altered from Fleck 1979, p. 86, original emphasis).