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Teaching Philosophy

Volume 30, Issue 2, June 2007
Teaching in the New Climate of Conservatism

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Displaying: 1-10 of 15 documents


articles
1. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Michael Goldman From the Editor
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2. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Anita M. Superson Teaching in the New Climate of Conservatism: Introduction
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This paper (1) summarizes the main points of the papers in the volume which demonstrate some of the ways that academic freedom is at odds with recent conservative attacks on the professoriate; (2) argues that some of the conservative attacks from students on faculty are at base a failure to acknowledge their equal personhood, but treat them as inferior beings and thus elicit harmful psychological reactions similar to those found in victims of racist slurs; and (3) examines possible solutions, including distancing on the part of faculty, and distributing the burden of critical thinking among all faculty and college courses, thereby making academic freedom a reality for all.
3. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Alison M. Jaggar Teaching in Colorado: Not a Rocky Mountain High; Academic Freedom in a Climate of Repression
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The main purpose of this paper is to offer an account of academic freedom. By way of context, it begins with a brief history of challenges to academic freedom at the University of Colorado. It then turns to the following questions. Who enjoys academic freedom and which of their activities does it protect? What is the relationship of academic freedom to constitutionally and internationally protected civil liberties? From whom or what does academic freedom provide protection? Is academic freedom compatible with public accountability? What are the rationales for academic freedom?
4. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Ann Cudd Revolution vs. Devolution in Kansas: Teaching in a Conservative Climate
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This paper is about teaching progressive ideas where fundamentalist and conservative views are prominent among the students. I take up two questions: What should we take our task as feminist teachers to be? How should it be carried out? I explore three teaching strategies that a progressive teacher might use in a hostile conservative climate: the whole truth strategy, the dismissal strategy, and the bridge strategy. I reject the first two of these and argue that the third is most likely to be effective and also best exemplifies the value of academic freedom.
5. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Jeanine Weekes Schroer Fighting Imperviousness With Vulnerability: Teaching in a Climate of Conservatism
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This essay explores challenges that arise for professors who teach critical theory in our current climate of conservatism. Specifically, it is argued that the conservative commitments to non-revolutionary change and reverence for tradition are corrupted in our current political and intellectual climate. This corruption, called “ideological imperviousness,” undermines the institutional structures put in place to produce a functional educational environment that protects the interests of both professors and students. The result is an environment that imposes an unjust vulnerability on professors and risks depriving students of the opportunity to acquire the critical skills necessary to combat their own vulnerabilities.
6. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Jennifer Faust Moving the Academy Closer to Utopia: What All Professors Can Do to Create LGBT-Friendly Campuses
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In spite of the fact that most university campuses are considered bastions of liberalism (in contrast to the conservative “mainstream”), it remains difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered faculty members and students to come out, and instances of poor treatment still occur. In addition, curricular issues related to LGBT identities and concerns continue to be met with resistance or outright hostility. In this paper, I argue that all faculty—not just LGBT faculty—have an obligation to play a more active role in creating an LGBT-friendly environment on their respective campuses. I end with suggestions for achieving this goal.
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7. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
George Matejka In Defense of Animals: The Second Wave , ed. Peter Singer
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8. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Irfan Khawaja Bioethics and the New Embryology: Springboards for Debate, by Scott F. Gilbert, Anna L. Tyler, and Emily J. Zackin
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9. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Karen I. Burke On Bullshit , by Harry G. Frankfurt
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10. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
James S. Kelly The Examined Life: Advanced Philosophy for Kids, by David A. White
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