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1. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Kevin S. Decker Teaching Autonomy and Emergence through Pop Culture: Kant, Dewey, and Captain Picard
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Teaching Kantian ethics is difficult, for “getting Kant right” extends to a wide field of concerns. This paper is aimed at instructors who wish to give interdisciplinary criticism of Kantian deontology by discussing exceptions naturalist critics take to Kant’s concept of “autonomy.” This concept can and should be supplanted by the notion of “emergent intelligence.” Surprising support for this project comes from the fictional exploits of Star Trek’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard. I conclude by indicating how the residual lessons from this criticism of Kant should lead us back to an understanding of emergence within Kant’s own third Critique.
2. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Eric C. Mullis On Being a Socratic Philosophy Instructor
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This paper discusses the use of the Socratic Method by philosophy instructors. I argue that Socrates employs both dissimulation and irony in enacting the elenchus and that these techniques should be evaluated before being used in the classroom. Dissimulation can be justified as it encourages students to think for themselves, however the use of irony is ill-advised as it is readily perceived as being boastful. Suggestions are made regarding how confrontational the Socratic instructor should be in encouraging students to developaccounts of their beliefs. Lastly, I consider how the instructor’s broader philosophical commitments can influence the enactment of the elenchus.
3. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Daryl Close Fair Grades
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Fair grading is modeled on two fundamental principles. The first principle is that grading should be impartial and consistent. The second principle is that a fair grade should be based on the student’s competence in the academic content of the course. I derive corollary principles of fair grading from these two basic principles and use them to evaluate common grading practices. I argue that exempting students from completing certain grade components is unfair, as is grading on attendance, class rank, deportment,tardiness, effort, institutional values, moral virtues such as cheerfulness and helpfulness, and other non-course-content criteria.
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4. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Patrick Beach Arguing About Knowledge
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5. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Kelly Flannery Political Philosophies in Moral Conflict
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6. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Cynthia Freeland What Philosophy Can Tell You About Your Cat
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7. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
J. M. Fritzman A Guide to Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception
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8. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Jerry Kapus Philosophical Tales
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9. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Daniel A. Kaufman Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge
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10. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 32 > Issue: 4
Jon McGinnis An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts
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