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articles

1. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Galen Barry

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Many students struggle to enter moral debates in a productive way because they automatically think of moral claims as ‘just opinions’ and not something one could productively argue about. Underlying this response are various versions of a muddled distinction between ‘facts’ and ‘opinions.’ This paper outlines a way to help students overcome their use of this distinction, thereby clearing an obstacle to true moral debate. It explains why the fact-opinion distinction should simply be scrapped, rather than merely sharpened. It then proposes a different distinction well suited to replace it. Finally, it outlines an activity which can be used to teach the new distinction, as well as a number of benefits to attempting the whole replacement process.
2. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
C. D. Brewer

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Here I describe a game that I use in my logic classes once we begin derivations. The game can help improve class dynamics, help struggling students recognizes they are not alone, open lines of communication between students, and help students of all levels prepare for exams. The game can provide struggling students with more practice with the fundamental rules of a logical system while also challenging students who excel at derivations. If students are struggling with particular rules or strategies in the system, the game can be tailored to address them. I explain how the game has evolved since I started using it, highlighting the pedagogical benefits of the changes I have made, and (in the appendix) I provide examples of the handouts I distribute and a “checklist” to use before, during, and after the game.
3. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Thomas Metcalf Orcid-ID

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I argue that colleges should include philosophy courses as general-education requirements. I begin by explaining the prima facie case against general-education requirements and the need for philosophers to defend their courses’ place in the general-education curriculum. Next, I present two arguments for philosophy as a general-education requirement. The first is the Argument from Content: that philosophy courses’ content tends to match the intended nature and purposes of general-education courses. The second is the Argument from Outcomes: that even if philosophy courses didn’t match the intended purposes of general-education courses, they would still be appropriate as general-education requirements, because there is empirical evidence that philosophy courses produce valuable skills and knowledge in students.
4. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Jeff Mitchell

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The distinction between weak and strong forms of critical thinking is a hallmark of Richard Paul’s pedagogy. He maintains that good reasoning entails a personal commitment to fair-mindedness. In this brief essay, I argue that Paul’s conception of fair-mindedness conflates cognitive empathy with empathetic concern and altruism. One’s understanding another’s perspective by no means entails approving of it, and one may seek to better grasp this standpoint for purely selfish reasons. Depending upon the circumstances, the other could be one’s competitor, enemy, mark, or even intended victim. This implies that while we may wish that the world were otherwise, even very bad people can be highly effective critical thinkers.
5. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Jake Wright

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I argue that campus closures and shifts to online instruction in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic created an obligation to offer courses asynchronously. This is because some students could not have reasonably foreseen circumstances making continued synchronous participation impossible. Offering synchronous participation options to students who could continue to participate thusly would have been unfair to students who could not participate synchronously. I also discuss why ex post facto consideration of this decision is warranted, noting that similar actions may be necessary in the future and that other tough pedagogical cases share important similarities with this case.

book reviews

6. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Patrick D. Anderson

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7. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Errol Ball Orcid-ID

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8. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Teresa Baron

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9. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Patrick Brissey

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10. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Brett A. Fulkerson-Smith

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11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Andy Hakim

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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Fraser Landry

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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Daniel Massey

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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Senem Saner

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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Bart Schultz

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