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Displaying: 1-7 of 7 documents


1. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Jennifer Lisa Vest Perverse and Necessary Dialogues in African Philosophy
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This article examines the concerns and debates that have arisen in African philosophy over the last few decades, and asks whether it continues to be necessary for African philosophy to take on what the author calls “perverse questions” or “perverse preoccupations” with the West. The author argues that to engage and respond to questions about the intellectual capabilities of African thinkers or the possible existence of philosophical resources in African cultures is to respond to perverse questions. To engage in academic dialogues implicitly or explicitly guided by a request or a felt need to justify and defend the very possibility of African philosophy or African rationality is to engage in perverse and unnecessary dialogues. Because these perverse debates often precede, prevent, or condition the formulation of what count as necessary debates, it is important that they be identified and critically assessed, and when possible, dispensed with. Only then can African philosophy pursue necessary and fruitful debates.
2. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Oseni Taiwo Afisi Human Nature in Marxism-Leninism and African Socialism
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Understanding the true nature of the human being is no doubt a sine qua non for developing an ideology for a desirable praxis. This paper examines the pitfalls of Marxist-Leninist scientific socialism and African socialism. It argues that a critical analysis of both ideologies reveals a lack of clear understanding of the nature of man by their proponents. An exhaustive account of the nature of man must explain self-consciousness, the urge to avoid pain, the desire for a purposeful life and for freedom from external interference, the passion for distinction, and, most importantly, the desire to acquire personal property. The paper further contends that socialism (whether scientific or African), does not allow room for the pursuit of personal ambition. This accounts for the failure in the implementation of both Marxist-Leninist socialism and African socialism. The paper avers that there is need to understand that the human being cannot simply be seen as a socio-economic or historical being; rather, consideration of the intrinsic elements which constitute the true nature of personhood is quintessential to achieving awell-ordered society.
3. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Ademola Kazeem Fayemi, O.C. Macaulay-Adeyelure A Philosophical Examination of the Traditional Yoruba Notion of Education and its Relevance to the Contemporary African Quest for Development
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This paper undertakes a philosophical investigation of the implications of the traditional Yoruba understanding of education for the contemporary African quest for development. The paper argues that the Yoruba conception of education is marked by the underlying philosophical principles of functionalism, moralism and progressivism. These principles, the paper contends, are of great relevance to the quest of contemporary African societies for education that will serve as a catalyst for development.
4. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Oladele Abiodun Balogun A Philosophical Comparison of the Educational Thoughts of Obafemi Awolowo and Tai Solarin
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This paper compares the educational thoughts of Obafemi Awolowo and Tai Solarin. Its methodology is critical and comparative. The paper argues that the variations of the political philosophies of the two thinkers account for the differences in their views on education. It further contends that the educational ideas of both thinkers reflect African cultural experiences. The paper also explores the possibility of integrating the insights of the two thinkers into the educational policies and practices of contemporary African societies.
5. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Makumi Mwagiru Re-inventing the Future: Linkages between Human Rights, Foreign Policy and Regional Integration
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This paper raises questions concerning the emerging trends of regional and international relations. In this endeavour, it examines new insights from traditional perspectives. The paper explores the outer contours of the conceptual linkages between human rights, foreign policy and regional integration in the East African context. Its central argument is that the major debates in the discipline of international relations are ultimately controversies about its theoretical basis.
6. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Nahashon W. Ndung’u Persistence of Features of Traditional Healing in the Churches in Africa: The Case of the Akurinu Churches in Kenya
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One of the attractions of new converts from mainline churches to the African Instituted Churches (AICs) is faith healing. Healing understood in its wider sense asthe restoration of the wholeness of life is not new to African communities, since they practiced it long before the coming of Christianity into their continent. This article examines some features of traditional healing which are manifested in faith healing in the AICs. The persistence of these features pauses a challenge to mainline churches in Africa, forcing them to rethink their approach to life threatening issues such as witchcraft and barrenness that continue to preoccupy many of their adherents.
book review
7. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 1 > Issue: 2
Samson O. Gunga Reginald M.J. Oduor’s Introduction to Ethics
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