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Displaying: 1-7 of 7 documents


1. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Reginald M.J. Oduor, Ph.D. Editor’s Note
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2. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Reginald M.J. Oduor A Critical Review of D.A. Masolo’s Self and Community in a Changing World
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3. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
J.O. Famakinwa Revisiting Kwame Gyekye’s Critique of Normative Cultural Relativism
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This article examines Kwame Gyekye’s critique of normative cultural relativism. It argues that the implications of normative cultural relativism mentioned by Gyekye do not necessarily undermine the theory. Nevertheless, the article concedes that the fact that Gyekye’s arguments do not undermine normative cultural relativism does not make the theory itself plausible.
4. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Rainer Ebert, Reginald M.J. Oduor The Concept of Human Dignity in German and Kenyan Constitutional Law
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This paper is a historical, legal and philosophical analysis of the concept of human dignity in German and Kenyan constitutional law. We base our analysis on decisions of the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany, in particular its take on life imprisonment and its 2006 decision concerning the shooting of hijacked airplanes, and on a close reading of the Constitution of Kenya. We also present a dialogue between us in which we offer some critical remarks on the concept of human dignity in the two constitutions, each one of us from his own philosophical perspective.
5. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Jacinta Mwende Maweu The Morality of Profit In Business: Transforming Waste Into Wealth Through The Iko Toilet Business Venture In Nairobi, Kenya
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The main argument of this theoretical paper is that the pursuit of honest profits in a voluntary market exchange is not only moral but also ingrained in human nature, in that human beings pursue activities that benefit them and avoid those that cause them loss. Through an examination of the Kenyan business venture called Iko Toilet (which is a mix of the Kiswahili word ‘iko’ meaning ‘there is’ and the English word ‘toilet’ to literally mean ‘there is a Toilet’), the paper contends that there is no inherent contradiction between doing well (engaging in honest voluntary business transactions) in order to do good (maximize legitimate profits).
6. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Oriare Nyarwath The Luo Care for Widows (Lako) and Contemporary Challenges
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This paper examines the Luo custom of caring for a ‘widow’ and for the home of a deceased husband, its rationale and some of its contemporary challenges. The paper maintains that this custom is still the best alternative available to the Luo widow and for the care of the home of one’s deceased brother, especially in the context of Luo culture. However, it recommends a number of adjustments to the practice to discourage some of the abuses that are becoming prevalent in it, with a view to making it more amenable to some of the challenges of our time.
7. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1
Peter M. Mumo Holistic Healing: An Analytical Review of Medicine-men in African Societies
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Since the advent of modernity and Christianity in Africa, indigenous African holistic healing, and especially its psychological aspect, has been given negative publicity. This article examines ways in which African traditional medicine men made and continue to make a significant contribution to healing in their societies. It argues that due to the numerous challenges in contemporary African societies, there is need for a pragmatic approach, in which all innovations that can alleviate human suffering are taken on board and encouraged as long as they do not compromise people’s health.