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Symposium

Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring/Printemps 2009

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Displaying: 1-20 of 21 documents


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1. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Todd May

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How might we think about equality in a non-hierarchical fashion? How might equality be conceived with some degree of equality? The problem with the presupposition of liberalism is that, by distributing equality, liberals place most people at the receiving end of the political operation. There are those who distribute equality and those who receive it. Once you start with that assumption, the hierarchy is already in place. It’s too late to return to equality. Equality, instead of being the result of a political process, must be conceived as the presupposition of those who act. It must be the expression of political actors rather than the possession of a political hierarchy. In the formulation of Jacques Rancière, whose ideas form the framework of my thinking in this paper, “Politics only happens when these mechanisms are stopped in their tracks by the effect of a presupposition that is totally foreign to them yet without which none of them could ultimately function: the presupposition of the equality of anyone and everyone.”
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2. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Lambert Zuidervaart

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This essay examines the nexus of politics and ethics in Theodor W. Adorno’s thought. First, the essay takes issue with emphaticethical readings of Adorno that overlook both the societal reach and the inherent limitations to his politics. These limitations arise from his neglecting questions of collective agency and societal normativity. Then, the essay shows that such neglect creates problems for Adorno’s moral philosophy. It concludes by suggesting that to do justice to the insights in Adorno’s thought a democratic politics of global transformation is required.
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3. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Graeme Nicholson

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This article examines Heidegger’s account of existence by proceeding through one of his early accounts of our historical being and then looking at two of his later treatments of our historical being. Throughout his whole work, Heidegger seeks to show that destiny, das Geschick, is the essential constituent of history, die Geschichte. My own argument—--which is intended as an extension and application of Heidegger’s, not merely an exegesis--—is to formulate a still broader concept derived from das Geschick, which I call civilisation. I conclude with the claim that civilisation is a normative principle as well as a descriptive one, and can take on the role of justifying thelaws and institutions of our communities.
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4. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Christian Lotz

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In this paper, I shall present an argument against Deleuze’s philosophy of painting. Deleuze’s main thesis in Logic of Sensation is twofold: [1] he claims that painting is based on a non-representational level; and [2] he claims that this level comes out of the materiality of painting. I shall claim that Deleuze’s theses should be rejected for the following reasons: first, the difference between non-intentional life and the representational world is too strict. I submit that the nonintentional relation that painting opens up is itself part of andemerges out of the representational force of painting. If this would not be the case, then the criterion for differentiating between paintings and other objects cannot be developed. Indeed, Deleuze fails to give us a criterion. Second, Deleuze’s way of dealing with materiality in painting remains unsatisfactory insofar as he is unable to take into account how materiality is charged with an “attitude toward the world.” In sum, materiality can only be painting’s materiality if we understand it as being formed and disclosed in representation.
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5. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Ashley Woodward

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Gianni Vattimo occupies the relatively rare position of being both a prominent philosopher and an engaged politician. This article outlines Vattimo’s philosophy of “weak thought” and his democratic socialist politics, and argues that there is a “gap” between them: his stated political positions seem at odds with aspects of his philosophy. This gap between the philosophical and the political is examined with reference to the topic of globalised capitalism. I then apply Vattimo’s own strategy in reading other philosophers to his thought, attempting to draw out the possible political implications of weak thought against his own stated position. I do this through theapplication of one of Vattimo’s central concepts, Verwindung (“twisting-free”), to globalised capitalism. I conclude with some reflections on the prospects for a politics of weak thought.
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6. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Kimberly Baltzer-Jaray

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Contemporary scholars have generally labelled Adolf Reinach, a founding member of early phenomenology’s Göttingen Circle, a Platonist. Because Reinach conceives of states of affairs as neither real nor ideal, as involved with timeless essences and necessary logical laws, many have hastily concluded that states of affairs are Platonic entities. In this essay, I analyse Barry Smith’s argument that Reinach is a Platonist. Smith’s widely accepted argument often becomes utilised to show that Reinach and other phenomenologists, including Husserl, are Platonic realists (or, simply, Platonists). A closer look at Reinach’s text indicates, however, that he is notcommitted to Platonic realism.
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7. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Ian Angus

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8. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Emilia Angelova

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9. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Anna Carastathis

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10. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Lauren Bialystok

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11. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Jérôme Melançon

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12. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Joseph J. Tanke

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13. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Robert T. Valgenti

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14. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Paul Fairfield

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15. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Evan Clarke

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16. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Kiel Hume

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17. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Owen Glyn-Williams

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18. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
John Panteleimon Manoussakis

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19. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Paul Fairfield

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20. Symposium: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Charlene Elsby

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