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Displaying: 1-20 of 27 documents


1. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Memorial Notice
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plenary session: free will and moral responsibility
2. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Bruce N. Waller The Culture of Moral Responsibility
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commentaries
3. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Benjamin Vilhauer Human Rights and Moral Responsibility Skepticism
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4. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Gregg D. Caruso (Un)just Deserts: The Dark Side of Moral Responsibility
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articles
5. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Randall Auxier In Vino Veritas (Presidential Address)
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6. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Justin Robert Clarke Can Facts Be Truth-Makers?
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7. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Archie Fields III The Many Meanings of Success and the Failures of Fictions
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8. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Allison M. Merrick Contesting the Audience of Nietzsche’s Genealogy
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9. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Kyle Fruh Moral Heroism and the Requirement Claim
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10. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Robert William Fischer, Eric Gilbertson Salvaging Serviceability in Metaphysics
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11. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Maxwell Suffis From the Ground Up: Explaining Category Differences in Ontological Pluralism
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12. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Paul Carron, Anne-Marie Schultz The Virtuous Ensemble: Socratic Harmony and Psychological Authenticity
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13. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Sophia Stone The Role of ἀριθμός in Plato’s Phaedo
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14. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Stuart Rosenbaum Justice, the Lorax and the Environment
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Environmental ethicists do not often notice the power of stories to shape attitudes about our environment and its inhabitants. I argue that a pragmatist understanding of morality enables stories—and narratives generally—to shape attitudes and beliefs that have objective moral legitimacy. The Lorax, as well as other stories and narrative accounts, are not just children’s stories, but are essential tools for expressing objective moral concern about our environment. Michael Sandel’s (2009) book Justice (along with the moral thought of William James and John Dewey) expresses a pragmatist perspective about justice and the good that accords with this conclusion. The Lorax demands justice for the human environment.
15. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Julie Kuhlken Hume and the Ethics of Taste
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16. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Brian Harding Object Oriented Ontology and José Ortega y Gasset’s Anti-Idealist Interpretation of Phenomenology
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17. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Justin Remhof Object Constructivism and Unconstructed Objects
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18. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
James Rocha Forced to Listen to the Heart: Fetal Heartbeat Laws and Autonomous Abortions
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Among the various proposed ultrasound laws, a few have provisions that either provide the option for the pregnant woman to hear the heartbeat or require that the heartbeat be played and merely give the woman the option to somehow avert her ears. I will argue that these heartbeat provisions actually belie the argument that these laws are intended to assist autonomous choosing. Since the information could be provided just as easily through a factual statement (“The fetus has aheartbeat”), it cannot be justified to involve emotions in a way that the pregnant woman did not autonomously choose for herself.
19. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Sarah H. Woolwine, E.M. Dadlez When Complementarianism becomes Gender Apartheid: Feminist Philosophers’ Objections to the Christian Right
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20. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 30 > Issue: 1
Shane J. Ralston Doing versus Thinking: John Dewey’s Forgotten Critique of Scientific Management
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Scientific management introduced a novel way of organizing work and measuring productivity into the modern workplace. With a stopwatch and a clever method of analysis, Frederick Winslow Taylor is either acclaimed or reviled, depending on the audience, for giving industrial/organizational consultancy a groundbreaking tool: the efficiency study. What is less well known is that the American pragmatist John Dewey criticized scientific management for its dualistic assumptions, for treating workers as pure doers or “muscle” and management as pure thinkers or “brains” in an efficient, though inhumane, work process. The first section of this paper examines the similarities and differences between Dewey’s and Taylor’s respective conceptions of science and management. In the second section, I consider Dewey’s critique of scientific management in his book Democracy and Education. The paper concludes with some thoughts about the implications of Dewey’s critique of Taylorism for organizational theory and industrial relations today.