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Southwest Philosophy Review

Volume 34, Issue 1, January 2018

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Displaying: 1-10 of 24 documents


plenary session: ancient philosophy
1. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Anne-Marie Schulz Stirring up America’s Sleeping Horses: Cornel West, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Socratic Parrhesia (and Platonic Writing) in the Public Sphere
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plenary commentaries
2. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
R. Bensen Cain On the Valuing and Re-valuing of Socratic Parrhesia
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3. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
G. M. Trujillo, Jr., Terrell Taylor Socratic Oblivion and the Siren Songs of Academe: Responding to Anne-Marie Schultz’s “Stirring up America’s Sleeping Horses”
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articles
4. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Robyn R. Gaier Self-forgiveness in the Moral Domain: Presidential Address
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5. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Deborah K. Heikes Don’t be Ignorant
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“Ignorance” is receiving an increased amount of philosophical attention. The study of it even has its own name, “agnotology.” Some ignorance remains simply a case of not having enough information, but increasingly philosophers are recognizing a whole other type of ignorance, one that is socially constructed and often actively promoted. In the first section of this paper I examine perhaps the best known type of socially constructed ignorance, “white ignorance.” White ignorance reflects a lack of genuine understanding of the social realities of others and it creates injustice. In the second section of the paper, I consider what it means to “genuinely understand,” arguing that when it comes to issues of justice those with epistemic power have a moral obligation to at least attempt to understand others’ social realities.
6. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
E.M. Dadlez Kitsch and Bullshit as Cases of Aesthetic and Epistemic Transgression
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7. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
David Antonini Human Plurality as Object: An Arendtian Framework for Making Sense of Trump
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8. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Dustin Nelson We Should Not Take Human Rights So Seriously
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9. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Bob Fischer, Isaac Wiegman Disassociation Intuitions
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10. Southwest Philosophy Review: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1
Justin Bell Depression Applied to Moral Imagination: Deweyan Tools for Moral Inquiry
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Based upon research done by evolutionary psychologists into the reason why human beings feel depression in social situations, I argue that philosophers have significant warrant to consider depression as an important feature conditioning moral imagination. The moral imagination come up with new enterprises and new ways of organizing social life. This reorganization would meet many of the goals put forth by pragmatist philosopher John Dewey. I argue that depression will work as a leading clue and unique imaginative “space” to reconstruct various social situations.