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1. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen Scanlon on the Doctrine of Double Effect
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In recent work, T.M. Scanlon has unsuccessfully challenged the doctrine of double effect (DDE). First, comparing actions reflecting faulty moral deliberations and involving merely foreseen harm with actions reflecting less faulty moral deliberations involving intended harm suggests that proponents of DDE do not confuse the critical and the deliberative uses of moral principles. Second, Scanlon submits that it is odd to say to a deliberating agent that the permissibility of the actions she ponders depends on the intention with which she will act. I argue that this can be explained without appeal to the claim that intentions are irrelevant to permissibility.
2. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Carlo Filice Libertarian Autonomy and Intrinsic Motives
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This paper suggests that libertarians should avail themselves of a system of natural and autonomy-friendly motivational foundations—intrinsic motives. A psyche equipped with intrinsic motives could allow for some degree of character-formation that is genuinely and robustly autonomous. Such autonomy would rest on motives that are one’s own in the most direct way: they are part of one’s natural make-up. A model with intrinsic motives can help libertarians in multiple ways: to deal with skeptics regarding the very idea of robust self-making; to explain the importance of autonomy (it helps explain how the agent can set her dominant life-goals on the basis of her own motives); to explain why an artificially induced, albeit rational, autonomy is less than genuine (it would not rely on the agent’s own motives).
3. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Jason Raibley Well-Being and the Priority of Values
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Leading versions of hedonism generate implausible results about the welfare value of very intense or unwanted pleasures, while recent versions of desire satisfactionism overvalue the fulfillment of desires associated with compulsions and addictions. Consequently, both these theories fail to satisfy a plausible condition of adequacy for theories of well-being proposed by L.W. Sumner: they do not make one’s well-being depend on one’s own cares or concerns. But Sumner’s own life-satisfaction theory cannot easily be extended to explain welfare over time, and it makes mistaken (autonomous, informed) self-assessment impossible. A new account of well-being based on the stable realization of personal values enjoys the advantages claimed for these subjective theories while avoiding these problems.
4. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Christopher A. Callaway Religious Reasons in the Public Square: A Virtue-Ethical Response to the Exclusivist/Inclusivist Debate
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This essay surveys some of the problems facing theories of public deliberation that are “exclusivist” insofar as they account for good participation in terms of a citizen’s refusal to use certain kinds of reasons. It then argues for a more promising alternative: one that focuses on citizens’ character rather than the content of their reasons. More specifically, it is possible to distinguish good participation from bad by considering the extent to which the citizen possesses and demonstrates the virtue of reasonableness. This virtue-based account avoids the problems facing exclusivism, while still providing a basis for evaluating civic participation.
5. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Nathan Placencia Am I Who I Say I Am? Social Identities and Identification
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This paper aims at further elucidating our understanding of social identities. It does so by focusing on a kind of subjective attachment people have to their social statuses, e.g., their race, ethnicity, gender, familial roles, and other social roles. Specifically, the kind of subjective attachment at issue is identification. Some philosophers have argued that we identify with our social statuses when we self-consciously adopt them as our own. This paper argues against this view and instead suggests that we identify with our social statuses when we care about them. Moreover, it theorizes care as a kind of emotional attunement to our social statuses that sometimes operates below the surface of self-reflective awareness.
6. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Glen Pettigrove, Nigel Parsons Palestinian Political Forgiveness: Agency, Permissibility, and Prospects
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It is often suggested that the resolution of the Israel-Palestine conflict will require forgiveness on the part of both Palestinians and Israelis. This paper looks at what such forgiveness might involve for one party to the conflict. It begins by offering an account of political forgiveness in which both collective actions and collective emotions play a significant role. It then explores whether there is a collective Palestinian agent capable of forgiving as well as whether it would be permissible for such an agent to forgive. It concludes with a discussion of key conditions that, if met, could facilitate Palestinian forgiveness.
review essay
7. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Michael J. Monahan Liberalism and the Challenge of Race: Two Views
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Derrick Darby’s Rights, Race, and Recognition and Ronald R. Sundstrom’s The Browning of America and the Evasion of Social Justice are two recent efforts to answer the challenges that race and racism pose to liberal theory. Darby draws upon civil rights and abolitionist discourse to advance an “externalist” account of political rights, while Sundstrom explores the strains placed upon liberalism by recent demographic trends. In this review essay, I provide a brief account of their overall arguments, and offer some further critical considerations.
book reviews
8. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Sarah Broadie The Constitution of Agency: Essays on Practical Reason and Moral Psychology
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9. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Robert K. Fullinwider The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education
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10. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Lisa J. McLeod Toward a Political Philosophy of Race
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11. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Books Received
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12. Social Theory and Practice: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 36
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