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general semiotics
1. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Han-liang Chang Is language a primary modeling system? On Juri Lotman’s concept of semiosphere
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Juri Lotman’s well-known distinction of primary modeling system versus secondary modeling system is a lasting legacy of his that has been adhered to, modified, and refuted by semioticians of culture and nature. Adherence aside, modifications and refutations have focused on the issue whether or not language is a primary modeling system, and, if not, what alternatives can be made available to replace it. As Sebeok would concur, for both biosemiosis and anthroposemiosis, language can only be a secondary modeling system on top of the biological experience of Umwelt or human sensory system. This paper proposes to explore the possibility of a “preverbal” modeling system suggested by Lotman’s spatial concept of semiosphere, and discuss its implications in cross-cultural dialogue.
2. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Han-liang Chang Kas keel on esmane modelleeriv süsteem? Juri Lotmani mõistest ‘semiosfäär’. Kokkuvõte
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3. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Han-liang Chang Является ли язык первичной моделирующей системой? О понятии семиосферы у Юрия Лотмана. Резюме
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4. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Augusto Ponzio Modeling, dialogue, and globality: Biosemiotics and semiotics of self. 1. Semiosis, modeling, and dialogism
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With our paper we intend to offer a critical overview of state of the art in semiotics, with specific reference to theoretical problems concerning the relationship between culture and nature. In other words, we intend to focus on the relationship between the concepts of semiosphere (Lotman) and biosphere (Vernadsky) considering the various approaches to this issue and proposing our own point of view. An important reference for a valid overview view of semiotics today is the Handbook Semiotik/Semiotics. It is no incident that the subtitle of this work is A Handbook on the Sign-Theoretic Foundations of Nature and Culture. In this handbook a fundamental role is carried out by Thomas A. Sebeok and his particular approach to semiotics, which may be designated as ‘global semiotics’. One of the pivotal concepts in Sebeok’s global semiotics is that of modeling which traverses nature and culture. This concept connects natural semiosis and cultural semiosis and ensues in an original formulation of the relationship between the notions of ‘semiosphere’ and ‘biosphere’. Such problematics respond to semiotic research in Tartu today, especially as it finds expression in the present journal. And, in fact, as in his book of 2001, Global Semiotics, Sebeok often underlined the importance of the Estonian connection himself in his writings for the development of semiotics.
5. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Augusto Ponzio Моделирование, диалог, глобальность: биосемиотика и семиотика самости. 1. Семиозис, моделирование, диалогизм. Резюме
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6. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Augusto Ponzio Modelleerimine, dialoog, globaalsus: biosemiootika ja enesesemiootika. 1. Semioos, modelleerimine, dialogism. Kokkuvõte
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7. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Susan Petrilli Modeling, dialogue, and globality: Biosemiotics and semiotics of self. 2. Biosemiotics, semiotics of self, and semioethics
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The main approaches to semiotic inquiry today contradict the idea of the individual as a separate and self-sufficient entity. The body of an organism in the micro- and macrocosm is not an isolated biological entity, it does not belong to the individual, it is not a separate and self-sufficient sphere in itself. The body is an organism that lives in relation to other bodies, it is intercorporeal and interdependent. This concept of the body finds confirmation in cultural practices and worldviews based on intercorporeity, interdependency, exposition and opening, though nowadays such practices are almost extinct. An approach to semiotics that is global and at once capable of surpassing the illusory idea of definitive and ultimate boundaries to identity presupposes dialogue and otherness. Otherness obliges identity to question the tendency to totalizing closure and to reorganize itself always anew in a process related to ‘infinity’, as Emmanuel Levinas teaches us, or to ‘infinite semiosis’, to say it with Charles Sanders Peirce. Another topic of this paper is the interrelation in anthroposemiosis between man and machine and the implications involved for the future of humanity. Our overall purpose is to develop global semiotics in the direction of “semioethics”, as proposed by S.Petrilli and A. Ponzio and their ongoing research.
8. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Susan Petrilli Моделирование, диалог, глобальность: биосемиотика и семиотика самости. 2. Биосемиотика, семиотика самости и семиоэтика. Резюме
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9. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Susan Petrilli Modelleerimine, dialoog, globaalsus: biosemiootika ja enesesemiootika. 2. Biosemiootika, enesesemiootika ja semioeetika. Kokkuvõte
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10. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Torkild Thellefsen, Christian Jantzen What relations are: A case study on conceptual relations, displacement of meaning and knowledge profiling
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The aim of the article is to introduce the knowledge profile as a tool to make realistic representations of knowledge organizations. In order to make these realistic representations, we must identify the fundamental sign of the given knowledge domains, since it seems to be the case that the fundamental sign puts epistemological constraints upon its research objects, eventually making the knowledge organization of a knowledge domain unique. Furthermore, the article points out that in order to make the realistic representations of knowledge organizations, we need a basic understanding of how conceptual relations emerge, develop and become related terms. In order to strengthen the theoretical points and to show the usability of the knowledge profile, we include a case study of a knowledge domain.