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general semiotics
1. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Peeter Torop Semiospherical understanding: Textuality
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The semiospherical approach to semiotics and especially to semiotics of culture entails the need of juxtaposing several terminological fields. Among the most important, the fields of textuality, chronotopicality, and multimodality or multimediality should be listed. Textuality in this paper denotes a general principle with the help of which it is possible to observe and to interpret different aspects of the workings of culture. Textuality combines in itself text as a well-defined artefact and textualization as an abstraction (presentation or definition as text). In culture, we can pose in principle the same questions both to a concrete and to an abstract text, although an abstract text is only an operational means for defining, with the help of textualization, a certain phenomenon in the interests of a holistic and systemic analysis. The practice of textualization in turn helps us to understand the necessity of distinguishing between articulation emerging from the textual material itself and articulation ensuing from textuality or textualization — the former provides for comparability between texts made from the same material, thelatter makes comparable all textualized phenomena irrespective of their material. Textuality is a possibility that culture offers to its analyser, and at the same time it is an ontological property of culture and an epistemological principle for investigating culture.
2. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Peeter Torop Cемиосферическое понимание: текстуальность. Резюме
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3. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Peeter Torop Semiosfääriline mõistmine: tekstuaalsus. Kokkuvõte
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semiotics of language
4. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Marcel Danesi Metaphorical “networks” and verbal communication: A semiotic perspective of human discourse
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This paper presents the notion that verbal discourse is structured, in form and contents, by metaphorical reasoning. It discusses the concept of “metaphorical network” as a framework for relating the parts of a speech act to each other, since such an act seems to cohere into a meaningful text on the basis of “domains” that deliver common concepts. The basic finding of several research projects on this concept suggest that source domains allow speakers to derive sense from a verbal interaction because they interconnect the topic of discussion to culturally-meaningful images and ideas. This suggests, in turn, that language is intertwined with nonverbal systems of meaning, reflecting them in the contents of verbal messages. Overall, the concept of metaphorical networks implies that human cognition is highly associative in structure.
5. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Marcel Danesi Метафорическая “сеть” и вербальная коммуникация: семиотическая перспектива человеческого дискурса. Резюме
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6. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Marcel Danesi Metafoorilised “võrgustikud” ja verbaalne kommunikatsioon: inimdiskursuse semiootiline perspektiiv. Kokkuvõte
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7. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
М. Паладян Функция характеризации в настоящем времени
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Michel Paladian. Function of characterization in present tense. This article is devoted to a field in cognitive and semantic analysis where stylistics and grammar meet: it concerns the function of characterisation in the Present tense. In general, linguistic works, which are devoted to the Present tense, take into account only the time and the aspect. However, from a point of cognitive view, the values of the Present are not limited to the Verb; they also relate to the values of the Adjective. We must thus take into consideration not only the Time conceptualisation (time features), but also the Space conceptualisation (space features). We know, since Davidson, how the event, which the Verb represents, can be broken up into phases; it is to the one of these phases that the function of actualisation is attached. Actualisation is parallel to the function of characterisation specific to the Adjective. As such this phase seizes, retains and assimilates entities and processes of the world in their instantaneous appearance. This cognitive operation can also be analyzed on another level: on the level of visual work.
8. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Michel Paladian Function of characterization in present tense. Abstract
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9. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
М. Паладян Karakterisatsiooni funktsioon olevikus. Kokkuvõte
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visual semiotics
10. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Winfried Nöth Semiotic foundations of the study of pictures
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Are pictures signs? That pictures are signs is evident in the case of pictures that “represent”, but is not “representation” a synonym of “sign”, and if so, can non-representational paintings be considered signs? Some semioticians have declared that such pictures cannot be signs because they have no referent, and in phenomenology the opinion prevails that they are not signs because they are phenomena sui generis. The present approach follows C. S. Peirce’s semiotics: representational and non-representational pictures and even mental pictures are signs. How and why pictures without a referent can nevertheless be defined as signs is examined on the basis of examples of monochrome paintings and historical maps that show non-existing or imaginary territories. The focus of attention is on their semiotic object and, in the case of non-representational paintings, on their interpretation as genuine icons, not in the sense of signs that represent most accurately, but in the sense of signs that represent nothing but themselves, i.e., self-referential signs.