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Displaying: 1-20 of 27 documents


1. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Richard L. Lanigan The semiotic phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Michel Foucault
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Postmodern methodology in the human sciences and philosophy reverses the Aristotelian laws of thought such that (1) non-contradiction, (2) excluded middle, (3) contradiction, and (4) identity become the ground for analysis. The illustration of the postmodern logic is Peirce’s (1) interpretant, (2) symbol, (3) index, and (4) icon. The thesis is illustrated using the work of Merleau-Ponty and Foucault and the le même et l’autre discourse sign where the ratio [Self:Same :: Other:Different] explicates the communicology of Roman Jakobson in the conjunctions and disjunctions, appositions and oppositions of discours, parole, langue, and langage.
2. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Richard L. Lanigan Семиотическая феноменология Мориса Мерло-Понти и Мишеля Фуко. Резюме
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3. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Richard L. Lanigan Maurice Merleau-Ponty ja Michel Foucault’ semiootiline fenomenoloogia. Kokkuvõte
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4. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Jorge Conesa Sevilla The realm of continued emergence: The semiotics of George Herbert Mead and its implications to biosemiotics, semiotic matrix theory, and ecological ethics
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This examination of the often-inaccessible work and semiotics of George Herbert Mead focuses first on his pivotal ideas of Sociality, Consciousness, and Communication. Mead’s insight of sociality as forced relatedness, or forced semiosis, appearing early in evolution, or appearing in simple systems, guarantees him a foundational place among biosemioticians. These ideas are Mead’s exemplar description of multiple referentiality afforded to social organisms (connected to his idea of the generalized other), thus enabling passing from one umwelt to another, with relative ease. Although Mead’s comprehensive semiosis is basically sound, and in concordance with modern and contemporary semiotics (and biosemiotics), it nevertheless lacks a satisfactory explanation of how conscious organisms achieve passing into new frames of reference. Semiotic Matrix Theory (SMT), its pansemiosis, describes falsifiable existential and cognitive heuristics of recognizing Energy requirements, Safety concerns and Possibility or Opportunity as “passing” functions. Finally, another type of emergence, ecoethics, isan embedded constant in biosemiosis. Not all semiosis is good semiosis, not all text is good text. Because our species is moving away from ancient biosemiosisand interrelatedness, this historicity, even ductile enough to invent synthetic semiosis or capricious umwelten, is facing the ecological reality and consequences of an overly anthropocentric text.
5. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Jorge Conesa Sevilla Область продолжающего творчества: семиотика Джорджа Герберта Мида и ее результаты в биосемиотике, теории семиотической матрицы и экологической этике. Резюме
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6. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Jorge Conesa Sevilla Jätkuva loomingu valdkond: George Herbert Mead’i semiootika ja selle tulemid biosemiootikas, semiootilise maatriksi teoorias ja ökoloogilises eetikas. Kokkuvõte
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7. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Marcel Danesi The Fibonacci sequence and the nature of mathematical discovery: A semiotic perspective
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This study looks at the relation between mathematical discovery and semiosis, focusing on the famous Fibonacci sequence. The serendipitous discovery of this sequence as the answer to a puzzle designed by Italian mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci to illustrate the efficiency of the decimal number system is one of those episodes in human history which show how serendipity, semiosis, and discovery are intertwined. As such, the sequence has significant implications for the study of creative semiosis, since it suggests that symbols are hardly arbitrary products of human reason, but rather unconscious probes of reality.
8. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Marcel Danesi Fibonacci rida ja matemaatilise avastuse loomus: Semiootiline vaade. Kokkuvõte
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9. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Marcel Danesi Последовательность чисел Фибоначчи и сущность математи-ческого открытия. Резюме
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10. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Stephen Jarosek The semiotics of sexuality: The choice becomes the association of habits becomes the desire becomes the need
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Pragmatism is the idea that we attribute meaning to things that matter to us. Ultimately, the things that matter are intercepted by our bodies — our eyes, ears, nose, hands, feet, skin — right down to our sex differences. Our bodies are the tools with which we interface with the world — the cultural world. Sex differences provide major insights into how the body impacts on experience and thus, personality and ultimately culture’s gender roles. In my earlier paper, I discuss what Peirce identified as fundamental aspects of cognition — habits and associative learning — and I place them in the context of Heidegger’s Dasein. In this current paper, I develop on these ideas in order to apply them to understand gender roles. From the inextricable connection between habits, associative learning andDasein, we can infer the following: (1) Gender roles are habits; (2) Gender roles are chosen; (3) Men and women “like” the roles to which they have beenassigned (this is a fundamental expression of Dasein). That is to say — the choice becomes the association of habits becomes the desire becomes the need. Hence arise the needs by which gender roles are identified.
11. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Stephen Jarosek Soolisuse semiootika: Valikust saab harjumusseos, saab soov, saab vajadus. Kokkuvõte
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12. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Stephen Jarosek Семиотика сексуальности: выбор становится привычкой, желанием, потребностью. Резюме
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13. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Leonid Tchertov Perceptographic code in visual culture
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Visual culture can be considered from semiotic point of view as a system of visual codes. Several of them have natural routs. So the perceptual code is formed already on biological level mediating translation of sensory data into perceptual images of the spatial world. The means of natural perceptual code are transformed in culture, where they are involved in communication by depictions. The depiction on the flat performs the function of a “perceptogram”, which, on one hand, is an external record of an internal perceptual image or an idea, and, on the other hand, serves as a program for a spectator’s visual perception. The means of this “perceptography” form an artificial code, which is, on the contrary to the perceptual code, communicative, deliberately used and transformed in various ways at different periods of time in diverse kinds of practical and artistic activity. Not all perceptograms become pieces of art, but all history of pictorial arts can be considered as a process of development and mastering with the different versions of this perceptographic code. The changes of this code in visual culture are connected with the intrinsic development of “vision forms” as well with invention of external means of communication.
14. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Leonid Tchertov Перцептографический код в визуальной культуре. Резюме
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15. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Leonid Tchertov Pertseptograafiline kood visuaalkultuuris. Kokkuvõte
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theory of semiosphere
16. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Peeter Torop Semiosphere and/as the research object of semiotics of culture
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Since 1984 when J. Lotman’s article “On semiosphere” was published, this concept has been moving from one terminological field to another. In the disciplinary terminological field of the Tartu–Moscow School semiotics of culture, ‘semiosphere’ is connected with terms ‘language — secondary modelling system — text — culture’. From interdisciplinary terminological fields, the associations either with biosphere and noosphere, or with logosphere, are more important. As a metadisciplinary concept, semiosphere belongs to the methodology of culture studies and is associated with the concepts of holism and the part and the whole. In this context, semiosphere marks the complementarity of disciplines studying culture, the movement towards the creation of general culture studies and “understanding methodology”. On the background of the contemporary trends of science it has to be remembered that semiosphere is simultaneously an object- and a metaconcept. The dynamism of culture as a research object forces science to search for new description languages but the new description languages in turn influence the cultural dynamics as they offer new possibilities for self-description. Often, however, from a historical perspective, a new description language is nothing but a methodological translation. Thus also the term semiosphere joins together several concepts that are related to semiotics of culture and that have gained new relevance on the background of the culture’s developmental dynamics. The concept of semiosphere brings semiotics of culture again into contact with its history, as it also brings applicational cultural analysis into contact with the history of culture and with the newest phenomena in culture. These contacts determine the place of the semiotics of culture among the sciences studying culture.
17. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Peeter Torop Семиосфера и/как объект исследования семиотики культуры. Резюме
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18. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Peeter Torop Semiosfäär ja/kui kultuurisemiootika uurimisobjekt. Kokkuvõte
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19. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Kalevi Kull Semiosphere and a dual ecology: Paradoxes of communication
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This article compares the methodologies of two types of sciences (according to J. Locke) — semiotics, and physics — and attempts thereby to characterise the semiotic and non-semiotic approaches to the description of ecosystems. The principal difference between the physical and semiotic sciences is that there exists just a single physical reality that is studied by physics via repetitiveness, whereas there are many semiotic realities that are studied as unique individuals. Seventeen complementary definitions of the semiosphere are listed, among them, semiosphere defined as the space of qualitative (incommensurable) diversity. It is stated that, paradoxically, diversity, being a creation of communication, can also be destroyed due to excessive communication.
20. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 33 > Issue: 1
Kalevi Kull Семиосфера и двоякая экология: парадоксы коммуникации. Резюме
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