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1. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
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2. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Marcel Danesi Opposition theory and the interconnectedness of language, culture, and cognition
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The theory of opposition has always been viewed as the founding principle of structuralism within contemporary linguistics and semiotics. As an analytical technique, it has remained a staple within these disciplines, where it continues to be used as a means for identifying meaningful cues in the physical form ofsigns. However, as a theory of conceptual structure it was largely abandoned under the weight of post-structuralism starting in the 1960s — the exception tothis counter trend being the work of the Tartu School of semiotics. This essay revisits opposition theory not only as a viable theory for understanding conceptual structure, but also as a powerful technique for establishing the interconnectedness of language, culture, and cognition.
3. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Marcel Danesi Теория оппозиций и соотносимость языка, культуры и восприятия. Резюме
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4. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Marcel Danesi Opositsiooniteooria ja keele, kultuuri ning taju seotus. Kokkuvõte
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5. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Patrizia Calefato Language in social reproduction: Sociolinguistics and sociosemiotics
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This paper focuses on the semiotic foundations of sociolinguistics. Starting from the definition of “sociolinguistics” given by the philosopher Adam Schaff, the paper examines in particular the notion of “critical sociolinguistics” as theorized by the Italian semiotician Ferruccio Rossi-Landi. The basis of the social dimension of language are to be found in what Rossi-Landi calls “social reproduction” which regards both verbal and non-verbal signs. Saussure’s notionof langue can be considered in this way, with reference not only to his Course of General Linguistics, but also to his Harvard Manuscripts.The paper goes on trying also to understand Roland Barthes’s provocative definition of semiology as a part of linguistics (and not vice-versa) as well asdeveloping the notion of communication-production in this perspective. Some articles of Roman Jakobson of the sixties allow us to reflect in a manner which wenow call “socio-semiotic” on the processes of transformation of the “organic” signs into signs of a new type, which articulate the relationship between organicand instrumental. In this sense, socio-linguistics is intended as being sociosemiotics, without prejudice to the fact that the reference area must be human,since semiotics also has the prerogative of referring to the world of non-human vital signs.Socio-linguistics as socio-semiotics assumes the role of a “frontier” science, in the dual sense that it is not only on the border between science of language andthe anthropological and social sciences, but also that it can be constructed in a movement of continual “crossing frontiers” and of “contamination” betweenlanguages and disciplinary environments.
6. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Patrizia Calefato Язык в процессе социальной репродукции: социолингвистика и социосемиотика. Резюме
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7. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Patrizia Calefato Keel sotsiaalses taastootmises: sotsiolingvistika ja sotsiosemiootika. Kokkuvõte
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8. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Umberto Eco On the ontology of fictional characters: A semiotic approach
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Why are we deeply moved by the misfortune of Anna Karenina if we are fully aware that she is simply a fictional character who does not exist in our world?But what does it mean that fictional characters do not exist? The present article is concerned with the ontology of fictional characters. The author concludes thatsuccessful fictional characters become paramount examples of the ‘real’ human condition because they live in an incomplete world what we have cognitive access to but cannot influence in any way and where no deeds can be undone. Unlike all the other semiotic objects, which are culturally subject to revisions, and perhaps only similar to mathematical entities, the fictual characters will never change and will remain the actors of what they did once and forever
9. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Umberto Eco Об онтологии литературных героев: семиотический подход. Резюме
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10. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 1/2
Umberto Eco Kirjanduslike kangelaste ontoloogiast: semiootiline lähenemine. Kokkuvõte
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