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Displaying: 1-10 of 72 documents


1. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Dario Martinelli Introduction
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2. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Otto Lehto Studying the cognitive states of animals: Epistemology, ethology and ethics
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The question of cognitive endowment in animals has been fiercely debated in the scientific community during the last couple of decades (for example, in cognitive ethology and behaviourism), and indeed, all throughout the long history of natural philosophy (from Plato and Aristotle, via Descartes, to Darwin). The scientific quest for an empirical, evolutionary account of the development and emergence of cognition has met with many philosophical objections, blind alleys and epistemological quandaries. I will argue that we are dealing with conflicting philosophical world views as well as conflicting empirical paradigms of research. After looking at some examples from the relevant literature of animal studies to elucidate the nature of the conflicts that arise, I propose, in strict Darwinian orthodoxy, that cognitive endowments in nature are subject to the sort of continuum and gradation that natural selection of fit variant forms tends to generate. Somewhere between the myth of “free” humans and the myth of “behaviourally conditioned” animals lies the reality of animal behaviour and cognition. In the end, I hope to have softened up some of those deep-seated philosophical problems (and many quasi-problems) that puzzle and dazzle laymen, scientists and philosophers alike in their quest for knowledge about the natural world.
3. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Otto Lehto Изучая когнитивность животных: эпистемология, этология и этика. Резюме
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4. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Otto Lehto Loomade kognitiivsust uurides: epistemoloogia, etoloogia ja eetika. Kokkuvõte
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5. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Gisela Kaplan Animals and music: Between cultural definitions and sensory evidence
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It was once thought that solely humans were capable of complex cognition but research has produced substantial evidence to the contrary. Art and music, however, are largely seen as unique to humans and the evidence seems to be overwhelming, or is it? Art indicates the creation of something novel, not naturallyoccurring in the environment. To prove its presence or absence in animals is difficult. Moreover, connections between music and language at a neuroscientific as well as a behavioural level are not fully explored to date. Even more problematic is the notion of an aesthetic sense. Music, so it is said, can be mimetic, whereas birdsong is not commonly thought of as being mimetic but as either imitation or mimicry and, in the latter case, as a ‘mindless’ act (parrots parroting). This paper will present a number of examples in which animals show signs of responsiveness to music and even engage in musical activity and this will be discussed from an ethological perspective. A growing body of research now reports that auditory memory and auditory mechanisms in animals are not as simplistic as once thought and evidence suggests, in some cases, the presence of musical abilities in animals.
6. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Gisela Kaplan Loomad ja muusika: kultuurilised määratlused ja sensoorne tõendusmaterjal. Kokkuvõte
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7. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Gisela Kaplan Животные и музыка: культурные определения и сенсорные доказательства. Резюме
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8. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Karel Kleisner, Marco Stella Monsters we met, monsters we made: On the parallel emergence of phenotypic similarity under domestication
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Creatures living under the rule of domestication form a communicative union based on shared morphological, behavioural, cognitive, and immunologicalresemblances. Domestic animals live under particular conditions that substantially differ from the original (natural) settings of their wild relatives. Here we focus on the fact that many parallel characters have appeared in various domestic forms that had been selected for different purposes. These characters are often unique for domestic animals and do not exist in wild forms. We argue that parallel similarities appear in different groups in response to their interaction with theumwelt of a particular host. In zoosemiotic sense, the process of domestication represents a kind of interaction in which both sides are affected and eventuallytransformed in such a way that one is more integrated with the other than in the time of initial encounter.
9. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Karel Kleisner, Marco Stella Чудовища, которых встречали, чудовища, которых создали: о параллельном влиянии на фенотипическое подобие в ходе одомашнивания. Резюме
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10. Sign Systems Studies: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3/4
Karel Kleisner, Marco Stella Koletised, keda kohtasime, koletised, kelle lõime: fenotüüpilise sarnasuse paralleelsest tekkest kodustamise käigus
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