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1. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Donald Phillip Verene Metaphysics and the Origin of Culture
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How is metaphysics related to human culture? Any culture has at its base a concept of being. This concept of being is expressed through the power of the myth. Myth provides culture with a grasp of the whole, with the interrelations of the human, natural, and divine. The instinct to form the myth achieves its expression at the origin of culture. Once the origin is passed, myth passes into memory, but the instinct to grasp the whole of things remains. F. H. Bradley claims: “Metaphysics is the finding of bad reasons for what we believe upon instinct, but to find these reasons is no less an instinct.” Metaphysics is myth remembered. Once past the origin, the formation of being passes from the mythic imagination to the metaphysical imagination. The metaphysical imagination pursues an account of the whole of things through the power of the rational idea.
2. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
George Duke Dummett and the Origins of Analytical Philosophy
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Michael Dummett has argued that the linguistic turn, initiated by Frege, is the decisive moment in the birth of the analytical tradition and what distinguishes that tradition from other movements. The thesis of the paper is that Dummett’s account of the origins of the analytical tradition understates the extent to which Frege’s work, and the linguistic turn more generally, are responses to antinomies in the modern philosophical project. An adequate characterisation of the origins of the analytic tradition presupposes an account of the fundamental conceptual shift that occurred during the time of the scientific revolution and the epistemological problems that arose in conjunction with this shift.  This is why it is misleading to assert, with Dummett, that the really interesting developments in terms of understanding the analytical tradition are subsequent to Frege. The most productive contrast in terms of understanding the origins of the analytical tradition is not between pre and post Fregean thought, the paper argues, but between modern and premodern conceptions of philosophy and its relation to the world of everyday experience.
3. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
James L. Wood Is There an Archê Kakou in Plato?
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4. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Markus Gabriel God’s Transcendent Activity: Ontotheology in Metaphysics 12
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5. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Jameson Taylor Beyond Nature: Karol Wojtyla’s Development of the Traditional Definition of Personhood
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Karol Wojtyla’s The Acting Person is devoted to articulating how the experience and structure of action reveals that the person is an objective/subjective unity whose self-fulfillment is achieved by moral praxis. Wojtyla is attempting to harmonize the Boethian-Thomistic definition of man as an individual substance of a rational nature with a modern, phenomenological vision of man as an incommunicable subject.  In doing so, he adopts what might be termed a “maximalist” interpretation of Boethius’ definition, an interpretation that understands the basic concepts of substance, rationality, and nature as part of a deeper unity that also includes the aspects of subjectivity, consciousness, and personal love.  This unity is revealed through a phenomenological description of action.  Wojtyla’s personalist synthesis depends upon establishing the compatibility of the Aristotelian-Thomistic understanding of human nature with his own phenomenological analysis.  This article differentiates Wojtyla’s various uses of the term nature, indicating where he departs from or develops traditional views.  Most important is Wojtyla’s conclusion that while the natural order possesses its own integrity, it can only properly be understood in light of the personal order, or the order of love.  Love alone integrates the person, enabling him to both fully realize and transcend his natural potentialities.  Consequently, the person can only partially be identified with his human nature because his end lies in an order of love beyond the natural realm.
book reviews
6. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Kenneth J. Rolling SUMMARIES AND COMMENTS
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7. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Reviewer Index
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8. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Abstracts
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9. The Review of Metaphysics: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Announcements
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