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1. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 23
Ken Reynolds, Editor’s Notes
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2. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 23
Bruce Patterson, The Red Ensign and the Maple Leaf: Canada’s Two Flag Traditions
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Timed for the fiftieth anniversary of the adoption of the Canadian national flag, this article speaks to this flag as the culmination of a post-Second World War tradition that developed out of, and as a counterpoint to, the earlier flag tradition of Canadian banners based on the British ensign pattern or those which utilized emblems of British and French heritage.
3. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 23
Hugh L. Brady, “But It Was Ours”: The Red Ensign, Dominion Day, and the Effects of Patriotic Memory on the Canadian Flag Debate
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This paper examines the creation of patriotic memories of Canadian flags—in particular, the Canadian Red Ensign—among British Canadians through the lens of Dominion Day, challenging the legalistic view of flag adoption in favor of a vernacular view that national flags may be created, adopted, and sanctioned by those using a flag for that purpose and that flag is as much a national flag as any adopted by statute or regulation.
4. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 23
David W. Grebstad, The Flag of Our Fathers? The Manitoba Provincial Flag and British Cultural Hegemony in Manitoba, 1870–1966
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This article examines the adoption of the provincial flag of Manitoba in 1966 as a protest to the adoption of the new Canadian national flag in 1965. The new provincial flag symbolized 96 years of the establishment and preservation of British cultural hegemony in Manitoba and the result of an oppositional reaction to the evolving discourse of a bilingual and bicultural Canadian nationalism.
5. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 23
Forrest D. Pass, “A ‘Red Rag’ to an Infuriated Bull”: American Flags, Canadian Vexilloclasts, and the Origins of Canadian Flag Culture, 1880–1930
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Focusing on the period from 1880 to 1930, this paper examines some sixty American “flag incidents” where Canadian “vexilloclasts” strongly—sometimes violently—objected to displays of American flags in Canada and, at the same time, strengthened the development of Canadian flag culture in the form of the Union Jack and the Canadian Red Ensign.
6. Raven: A Journal of Vexillology: Volume > 23
Contributors to This Issue
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