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1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Eduardo Mendieta, Jeffrey Paris

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2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Mario Sáenz

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The concept of living labor in Marx’s Grundrisse represents the key notion that conceptually ties his early theory of alienation with the drafts of Capital of the 1860s. Through a critique of the formalism that opened space for Marx’s economic writings, I explore living labor, not only as alienated within the capital–laborrelation, but as an absolute, metahistorical exteriority. Furthermore, the interpretive writings of Enrique Dussel on the Grundrisse are contrasted with the reading ofMichael Hardt and Antonio Negri to show how living labor can be understood as ethical excess within the framework of biopolitical production.
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3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Kathryn Russell

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Both feminists and Marxists have realized that it is necessary to avoid reductionism and recognize the intersections between gender, race, and class. But we donot have a methodology sufficient to develop this idea. I argue that Bertell Ollman’s book Dance of the Dialectic provides a way to think about intersectionality usingMarx’s methodology of abstraction and his theory of internal relations. As a relational abstraction, gender is intersectional. We may legitimately focus on it, as longas we treat it dialectically. We can recognize that it is not homogeneous but stands in relations of identity and/or contradiction with other social relations.
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4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Patricia Huntington

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This reflection considers my dawning realization that Zapatista insurgency reflects not only opposition to racist devaluation of the cultures of indigenous peoplesbut more fundamentally a struggle to overcome spiritual deracination. I contest two basic assumptions of much contemporary social theory: that race and deracination are entirely socio-cultural phenomena and that the central role played by dialogical accord in Zapatista communities can be understood without a spiritual conception of human existence. I propose that only a spiritual understanding of these three pivotal issues—race, deracination, and dialogue (or accord)—aptly captures the core intuitions that inform Zapatista insurgency.
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5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Mariana Ortega

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6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Cynthia Willett

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7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1

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