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Displaying: 1-10 of 30 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Peter Gratton Editors’ Introduction
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2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden A Note from the Coordinator
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articles
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Joshua Rayman Entrenched: A Genealogy of the Analytic-Continental Divide
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The conventional view is that analytic philosophy has dominated American philosophy departments since 1950 and that continental philosophy and pragmatism have been marginalized almost out of existence due to philosophical inferiority or McCarthyist persecution. But a precise historical treatment of transformations in the field shows that this is, in fact, the golden age of continental philosophy and pragmatist scholarship, that McCarthyism had nothing to do with pragmatism’s fall from dominance, and that the shape of the field depends more on larger academic-historical trends. However, McCarthyism likely had lasting effects on analytic control of powerful qualifying institutions.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Richard Ganis Caring for Nature in Habermas, Vogel, and Derrida: Reconciling the Speaking and Nonspeaking Worlds at the Cost of “Re-enchantment”?
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En rapport with Jürgen Habermas, this paper argues for an environmental ethics that formalistically links the “good-for-nature” to the communicatively conceived “good-for-humanity.” This orientation guards against the possibility of humanity’s “knowledge-constitutive interest” in the instrumentalization of the environment being pressed forth as a project of limitless domination and mastery. Such an ethics is nonetheless well supplemented with Axel Honneth’s idea of an “indirect” recognitional attitude toward the world of objects, which accommodates the impulse of “care” for nature without succumbing to the aporias of a naturalistic ethic. The essay contends that the categorical resources needed to avert the slide toward naturalism are dissolved in the antifoundationalist “critiques of nature” advanced by Steven Vogel and Jacques Derrida.
symposium
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Cheyney Ryan Under Discussion: The Chickenhawk Syndrome: War, Sacrifice, and Personal Responsibility
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6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Anatole Anton The Twilight of Martial Liberalism: Reflections on Cheyney Ryan’s The Chickenhawk Syndrome
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7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Michael Philip Brown Recognition of the Other and Our Requirements to Kill: Thoughts on The Chickenhawk Syndrome
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8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden From Combat Boots to Civilian Shoes: Reflections on The Chickenhawk Syndrome
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9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Cheyney Ryan Replies to Anatole, Michael, and Harry
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book reviews
10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Matthew Quest C.L.R. James’ New Notion
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