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Displaying: 1-10 of 12 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden Editor’s Introduction
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2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Randall Williams The Ballot and the Bullet: Anti-Juridical Praxis from Malcolm X and Nelson Mandela to the Bolivarian Revolution
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This essay examines multiple iterations of anti-juridicalism in relation to shifting forms of postwar imperialism and decolonization. The anti-juridical designates a differential political praxis of rights and law grounded in conditions of subalternity and revolutionary struggle. It stands in opposition to the abstract, neutraluniversality advanced by dominant theories of liberallegalism and hegemonic conceptions of the rule of law. In contemporary modalities, anti-juridical praxis serves as a necessary, critical supplement to the articulation of constituent power in the postcolony with profound implications for constructing a state of law and justice, and for building of a new internationalism of peoples.
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Robert C. Perez Guantánamo and the Logic of Colonialism: The Deportation of Enemy Indians and Enemy Combatants to Cuba
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The creation of the prison camp at the U.S. naval base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba is part of a historical continuity of colonialism on the island. Over two hundred years before the United States sent the first "enemy combatants" to Cuba, the Spanish Empire began sending "enemy Indians" to the island. The rationales and circumstances that gave rise to the prison complex in Guantánamo share much in common with those that motivated Spain to imprison Apaches and other Native people on Cuba. This essay argues that the policies of both Spain and the United States have roots in a similar logic of colonialism.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Sebastian Purcell Two Paths to the Ontological Turn: Alain Badiou and Slavoj Žižek on Events and Politics
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Discourses on the “event” today mark a profound opportunity for philosophic thought to change direction in its focus, particularly for those interested in the prospect of rehabilitating the communist hypothesis. Of the thinkers that have come to write on this topic Alain Badiou and Slavoj Žižek have emerged as leading the way. Their joint proposal aims to subvert the need for epistemological reflection by (re)turning to a totally new sense of ontology, one that results in a new account of revolutionary, or “evental,” political action. Yet while animated by a joint aim, both thinkers propose utterly distinct paths to their conclusion: Žižek proposes a "finite" account of evental change, Badiou an "infinite" account. The aim of the present essay is thus to evaluate these competing claims, and it is argued that while Žižek's work is laudable in many respects, it nevertheless fails to grasp the full scope of Badiou's critique of finitude. Žižek's proposed revival of Post-Kantian Idealism, then, is exposed as highly problematic, so that the only reasonable path for philosophic thought is to follow Badiou's turn to infinite thought in some way.
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Elizabeth Purcell Fetishizing Ontology: Julia Kristeva and Slavoj Žižek on the Structure of Desire
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Recently Slavoj Žižek has critiqued certain "feminist" readings of Lacan's feminine structure of desire, including Julia Kristeva, for postulating a feminine discourse which is supposedly beyond the phallic economy. This paper defends Kristeva's position, both by noting how Žižek Hegelian ontology prevents him from utilizing the resources of sexual difference and by clarifying Kristeva's double account of maternity. One consequence of this investigation is that a Kristevean theory of desire will provide one with a new form of political intervention by isolating sites of resistence that Žižek disavows. Another consequence is a refiguration of "feminist" psychoanalytic practice.
review essays
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Lorenzo Fabbri From Inoperativeness to Action: On Giorgio Agamben’s Anarchism
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7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
David Detmer Sartre: Anticolonialist, Antiracist
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book reviews
8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Michael Larson The Politics of Postanarchism
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9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Melissa A. Mosko Toward a New Humanity
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10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Contributors
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