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Displaying: 1-10 of 33 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden Editor’s Introduction
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2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Executive Editorial Committee A Thank-You Note to RPR’s Referees
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articles
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Jason Del Gandio Rethinking Immaterial Labor: Communication, Reality, and Neo-Radicalism
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Working from the post-Workerist tradition, this essay re-specifies the phenomenon of immaterial labor. Immaterial labor is not simply a mode of work relevant to the information-based global economy. Instead, immaterial labor is inherent to the human condition: human beings materialize realities through the immaterial means of communication. This ontological approach to immaterial labor enables us to rethink the radical project: rather than trying to “change the world,” we are now called to create alternative realities that resist the subjugation of our immaterial laboring. Since we are all immaterial laborers, we all have a stake in revolutionizing our realities. This essay provides a preliminary sketch of this political philosophy.
discussion: african american philosophy in crisis?
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Tommy J. Curry On Derelict and Method: The Methodological Crisis of African-American Philosophy’s Study of African-Descended Peoples under an Integrationist Milieu
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African-American/Africana philosophy has made a name for itself as a critical perspective on the inadequacies of European philosophical thought. While this polemical mode has certainly contributed to the questioning of and debates over the universalism of white philosophy, it has nonetheless left Africana philosophy dependent on these criticisms to justify its existence as “philosophical.” This practice has the effect of not only distracting Black philosophers from understanding the thought of their ancestors, but formulates the practice of Africana philosophy as “racial therapy” for whites. By making the goal of Africana philosophy the transformation of the white racist to the white non-racist, Africana philosophy takes up a decidedly political (integrationist) agenda. Making this agenda the guiding ethos of Africana philosophical praxis censors both the Africana thinkers available to study and the interpretation of the figures deemed “fit” for study. Thus I conclude a culturalogic approach is the best way to delineate between the political and methodological in Africana philosophy.
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Robert E. Birt Derelict Africana Philosophy?
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6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Tommy J. Curry It’s Still Black in the Details: Reflections on Robert Birt’s Interrogation of “On Derelict and Method”
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7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr. On Tommy Curry’s “On Derelict and Method”
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8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Tommy J. Curry It’s a Criticism . . . because “I” Said So?: A Reply to Lucius Outlaw’s Defense of Status Quo Disciplinarity
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essays on “undocumented people”
9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Eduardo Mendieta The Right to Political Membership: Democratic Morality and the Rights of Irregular Immigrants
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10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
José Jorge Mendoza Neither a State of Nature nor a State of Exception: Law, Sovereignty, and Immigration
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