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Displaying: 1-10 of 18 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Harry van der Linden, Editor's Introduction
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2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Nathan J. Jun, On Philosophical Anarchism
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In this essay I argue that what has been called “philosophical anarchism” in the academic literature bears little to no relationship with the historical anarchist tradition and, for this reason, ought not to be considered a genuine form of anarchism. As I will demonstrate, the classical anarchism of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is to be distinguished from other political theories in regarding all hierarchical institutions and relationships—including, but not limited to, the state—as incorrigibly dominative or oppressive and, for this reason, immoral. Lastly, I argue that defenders of such institutions and relationships must take the challenge posed by classical anarchism seriously by engaging substantively with actual anarchist positions.
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Donald Kingsbury, Populism as Post-Politics: Ernesto Laclau, Hegemony, and the Limits of Democracy
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The work of Ernesto Laclau develops a line of equivalences in which populism is hegemony is democracy is politics. Against this, I contend Laclau recreates rather than challenges basic tenets of modern liberalism and ultimately risks contributing to the “post political” order against his populist reason is deployed. Drawing from José Carlos Mariátegui, Antonio Gramsci, and Jodi Dean, I outline the limitations of hegemony theory and populism for thinking through the roadblocks and possibilities for social change in the present. The essay concludes with a provocation to de-center and de-fetishize democracy’s place in the radical imaginary.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Tom Malleson, A Community-Based Good Life or Eco-Apartheid
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If climate change continues unabated it will create massive insecurity and displacement, particularly for people in the Global South, leading to extreme pressure to migrate to the Global North. Yet political policy in the North is overwhelmingly hostile to large-scale immigration. We are therefore on a collision course of increased pressure to migrate facing increased barriers to migration – a global structure I refer to as eco-apartheid. This paper argues that preventing eco-apartheid requires, fundamentally, a massive shift in culture – from a vision of a good life with growth and consumption at its centre, to one centered on community, free time and relationships. However, this shift in culture can only be accomplished with a corresponding shift in our economies towards real security for all; real economic security requires a new kind of robust welfare state, premised on the provision of generous public services and work sharing to maintain high employment.
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Patricia S. Mann, On the Precipice with Naomi Klein, Karl Marx and the Pope: Towards a Postcapitalist Energy Commons and Beyond
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Why hasn’t the Marx-inspired Left seized upon catastrophic climate change as the basis for reconceiving historical materialism and the contradictions fueling anticapitalist struggle in the twenty-first century? Defining core participants as energy users and abusers, anchored in the opposition to fossil-fueled profit and growth rather than in traditional class conflicts, the struggle to create a postcapitalist energy commons can become the leading edge of a more broadly conceived global struggle for a sustainable and just postcapitalist society. The new global movement will be enabled by technologies of green energy microproduction, an energy internet for sharing energy on postcapitalist grids, and efforts to create more sustainable community relationships and practices. Catastrophic climate change can become the occasion for reigniting a Marx-inspired sense of transformative agency and solidarity that will enable us to confront transnational capitalism globally and locally in ways that are beyond the imaginative bounds of the current paper.
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Dan Wood, Political Philosophy and the Vestiges of Colonialism: A Critical Analysis of Žižek’s Leftist Plea for Eurocentrism
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In this essay I argue that Slavoj Žižek’s “A Leftist Plea for ‘Eurocentrism’” betrays, in an exceptionally telling way, the existence and persistence of dimensions of modern colonialism within contemporary continental philosophy. After offering a general characterization of the way in which the idea of the “West” is used to justify (neo)colonialist patterns of thinking, I provide a thorough criticism of each of Žižek’s central premises.
symposium: white privilege and black rights
7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
José Jorge Mendoza, Introduction
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8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Lawrence Blum, White Privilege, Injustice, and the "Black Lives Matter" Movement
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9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
Myisha Cherry, The Color and Content of Their Fears: A Short Analysis of Racial Profiling
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10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 19 > Issue: 3
John Murungi, Naomi Zack and In-Your-Face Philosophy
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