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Displaying: 1-10 of 15 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden, Editor's Introduction
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2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
John Harfouch, The Arab that Cannot be Killed: An Orientalist Logic of Genocide
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This paper argues that certain orientalist writings authorize the genocide of Arab peoples precisely by establishing the conditions for the impossibility of Arab death. Of particular import to this analysis is the nineteenth century philological work of famed orientalist Ernest Renan, who argues that Arabs are psychically inorganic because their language has never demonstrated the organic historical development characteristic of European peoples. The historico-logical impossibility of killing Arab peoples is essential not only if philosophers are going to grasp the rationale of the ongoing and often casual murder of Arabs, but also if scholars of race hope to comprehend the specificities of biopolitical racism, orientalizing racism, historical racism, animalizing racism, and so on.
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Jess M. Otto, Derrick Bell’s Paradigm of Racial Realism: An Overlooked and Underappreciated Theorist
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This article aims to introduce Bell’s work to philosophical audiences while also presenting his work for consideration within our contemporary discussions of race and racism. Bell’s contributions to our understanding of race have gone largely unnoticed, and that those who consider themselves philosophers of race are unfamiliar with the contributions of the intellectual father of Critical Race Theory is not only a failure of intellectual scholarship, but it is also a missed opportunity to take seriously the claims of a legal, political, and philosophical titan. The first section of this paper seeks to present Bell’s paradigm of racial realism and its constituent components. The second section explores what has led to Bell’s near complete exclusion from the discipline of philosophy, and philosophy of race specifically. The third section addresses the contributions that Bell’s theories can make to our contemporary discussions of race within the discipline of philosophy.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Gregory Fernando Pappas, The Limitations and Dangers of Decolonial Philosophies: Lessons from Zapatista Luis Villoro
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In this essay I pay homage to one of the most important but neglected philosophers of liberation in Latin America, Luis Villoro, by considering what possible lessons we can learn from his philosophy about how to approach injustices in the Americas. Villoro was sympathetic to liberatory-leftist philosophies but he became concerned with the direction they took once they grew into philosophical movements centered on shared beliefs or on totalizing theories that presume global explanatory power. These movements became vulnerable to extremes or vices that undermine their liberatory promise. I examine some of these worrying tendencies among that body of literature roughly described as “decolonial thought” (e.g., Enrique Dussel, Walter Mignolo). After a concise presentation of Villoro and the decolonial turn, I consider four dangers that this new liberatory-leftist movement faces and why Villoro should be a significant voice as the decoloniality debate moves forward.
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Shelley M. Park, Polyamory Is to Polygamy as Queer Is to Barbaric?
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This paper critically examines the ways in which dominant poly discourses position polyamorists among other queer and feminist-friendly practices while setting polygamists outside of those practices as the heteronormative and hyper-patriarchal antithesis to queer kinship. I begin by examining the interlocking liberal discourses of freedom, secularism and egalitarianism that frame the putative distinction between polyamory and polygamy. I then argue that the discursive antinomies of polyamory/polygamy demarcate a distinction that has greater affective resonance than logical validity—an affective resonance, moreover, that is built on neocolonial framings of polygamy as barbaric and idealizations of polyamory that whitewash its practices.
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
John-Patrick Schultz, Social Acceleration and the New Politics of Time
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Critical theory has recently charted the rise of an unprecedented wave of social acceleration transforming Western capitalism. Within that body of work, a tendency has emerged to frame this new temporality as a stable structure lacking in the possibility for visions of alternatives, let alone for substantive revolt or challenge. This essay argues that recent struggles like Occupy and 15-M experimented with an alternative, utopian temporality that challenged and disrupted acceleration, revealing the latter to be prone to generating and expanding the conditions of temporal struggle. Acceleration is therefore unstable, and cannot be adequately understood apart from its increasing cultivation of visions of and experiments in other temporalities.
review essay
7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden, Trump, Populism, Fascism, and the Road Ahead
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book reviews
8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Brandon Absher, McCarthyism and the Making of American Philosophy
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9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Peter Amato, Ethics, Politics, and Social Existence
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10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Yuanfang Dai, The Intersection of Chinese Philosophy and Gender
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