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Displaying: 1-20 of 30 documents


articles
1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Larry Alan Busk Radical Democracy with what Demos?: Mouffe and Laclau after the Rise of the Right
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This paper considers the radical democratic theory of Chantal Mouffe and Ernesto Laclau with reference to the recent rise of Right-wing populism. I argue that even as Mouffe and Laclau develop a critical political ontology that regards democracy as an end in itself, they simultaneously exclude certain elements of the demos. In other words, they appeal to formal categories but decide the political content in advance, disqualifying Right-wing movements and discourses without justification. This ambivalence between form and content reveals the limits of Mouffe and Laclau’s brand of radical democracy for understanding and critiquing the present political conjuncture.
2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Noah De Lissovoy Value and Violation: Toward a Decolonial Analytic of Capital
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While the decolonial turn calls into question the broad structure of Western knowledge projects, it also suggests an investigation of the central objects and categories of these projects. This study undertakes this latter investigation in relation to Marxist theory. Starting from the work of Frantz Fanon and contemporary theorists of coloniality, I consider three central figures in the Marxian critique of capital: enclosure, valorization, and real subsumption. Interrogating familiar and heterodox accounts of these figures, my analysis exposes an architecture of injury that comprehends the structure of value and that articulates a process of extended violation working beyond the dialectic.
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Andrew Feenberg Marcuse: Reason, Imagination, and Utopia
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Marcuse argues that society must be evaluated in terms of its unrealized potentialities. Potentialities are formulated by the imagination, which has an essential cognitive function in revealing what things might be. Utopian thinking, thinking that transcends the given facts toward their potentialities, is thus rational in Marcuse’s view. His explanation for this claim draws on Hegel, Marx, and phenomenology. With Freud, Marcuse elaborates the historical limits and possibilities of the imagination as an expression of Eros. Utopia is the historical realization in a refashioned world of the rational contents of the imagination.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Shari Stone-Mediatore Global Ethics, Epistemic Colonialism, and Paths to More Democratic Knowledges
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In recent decades, the literature of global ethics has promoted greater and more rigorous attention to transnational moral responsibilities. This essay argues, however, that prominent global-ethics anthologies remain burdened by Eurocentric/colonialist elements that contradict efforts to build more ethical transnational communities. Drawing on scholars of coloniality, including Enrique Dussel, Anibal Quijano, and Linda Tuhiwai Smith, the essay traces colonialist elements in deep structures of prominent global ethics texts. It examines how, even when texts argue for aid to the poor, these elements foster tendencies in the affluent world to detach from and dehumanize people on the other side of global hierarchies. They also deprive academic readers of the insights of grassroots global-justice struggles. The essay concludes by sketching some directions that those of us who study and teach global ethics might pursue in order to unsettle colonialist baggage and cultivate skills and relationships more conducive to ethical global communities.
symposium: theorizing race in the americas, by juliet hooker
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Stephanie Rivera Berruz Introduction
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6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Stephanie Rivera Berruz Juxtaposition, Futurity, and the Politics of Race and Sexuality
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7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Sergio Armando Gallegos-Ordorica Agonistic Racial Politics and Anti-Racism Strategies
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8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Amir Jaima Race Analysis in the Frame of Both Americas
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9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Juliet Hooker Mestizaje, Futurity, and Agonistic Racial Politics in Hemispheric Racial Thought
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book reviews
10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Anita Chari Beyond Marxology: Toward a Sensate Critique of Capital
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11. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Jeffrey A. Gauthier Gender, Social Construction, and The Second Sex
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12. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Alexander V. Stehn Loving Immigrants in America: The Philosophical Power of Stories
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13. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden Climate Change and Our Political Future
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14. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Nicole Whalen Overcoming Private Government
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15. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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16. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden A Note from the Editor
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21st-century socialism: concepts and visions
17. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Sebastian Purcell, Sarah E. Vitale Guest Editors' Introduction
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section 1: diagnosing the present moment
18. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
David Schweickart Capitalism vs the Climate: What Then Should We Do? What Then Should I Do?
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We are facing a terrifying moment in human history, but also a miraculous moment. At the very time when climate change threatens our species with extinction, we not only know that we face an existential threat, we have the means not only to avert catastrophe, but to provide virtually everybody on our planet with the material means for decent life. This paper asks, and attempts to answer, a series of questions: Why are we not doing what needs to be done? Is there a viable alternative to our current economic order? What then should I do?
19. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Tony Smith Beyond Extreme Monetary Policy . . . and Towards Twenty-First Century Socialism?
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Extreme monetary policies successfully prevented the “Great Recession” of 2007–2009 from turning into a global depression. However, they did not address the underlying problems in global capitalism. In recent years prominent “insiders” of global capitalism have proposed reforms designed to remedy these defects. I argue that these proposals are inadequate, due in great part to a failure to acknowledge a profound change in the “deep structure” of capitalism. Technological change, which in the past has contributed so much to the dynamism of capitalism development, no longer does so. The need for extreme monetary policies in the aftermath of the Great Recession of 2007–2009, the failure of these policies, and the lack of plausible alternatives to them, are all symptoms of an underlying disease beyond cure. A path towards a democratic form of socialism must be forged for the simple yet compelling reason Rosa Luxemburg articulated: it is a matter of socialism or barbarism.
section 2: visions of 21st-century socialism
20. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Sebastian Purcell Liberation Politics as a (New) Socialist Politics
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Liberation philosophy was born from radical, socialist roots. Yet recent developments by major figures in the tradition, including Enrique Dussel, would appear to position the movement unhelpfully closer to liberalism. The present article argues that this is a misconception, and that Liberation philosophy rather suggests a new ideal for conceptions of political justice, one that also helpfully avoids a number of common objections that dog traditional socialist proposals. The work of John Rawls is used as a dialogical counter point to suggest the relative merits for the new approach Liberation philosophy suggest for socialism.