Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-10 of 641 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden A Note from the Editor
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Marco Angella Axel Honneth, Reification, and "Nature"
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
I begin by briefly reconstructing Honneth’s concept of reification. His paradigm gives the reification of the non-human environment a marginal position in comparison to the reification of human beings, thereby detracting from its explanatory and critical potential. In order to avoid this outcome, I subsequently present a paradigm of subject identity formation in which not only affectively-based intersubjective interactions but also affectively-based interactions with the non-human environment are, in both a “genetic” and a “conceptual” sense, essential to establish an objective and meaningful relationship with external reality. On the basis of this paradigm a closer connection can be identified between the reification of human beings and the reification of the non-human environment—a connection in which the reification of the latter may reinforce human reification (and vice versa).
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Omar Dahbour Justice, Social not Global
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this article, I argue that justice is necessarily inapplicable to the global scale, since there is no such thing as a global society in the proper sense. I examine why this is so, and criticize two types of arguments for global justice—maximalist conceptions (such as those of Charles Beitz and Allen Buchanan) that argue for a robust notion of redistribution on the global scale, and minimalist conceptions (such as those of Thomas Pogge and Iris Young) that argue for a notion of redress or solidarity across borders.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Nathan Eckstrand Does Fidelity to Revolutionary Truths Undo Itself?: Systems Theory on Badiou and Žižek
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This article examines Alain Badiou’s and Slavoj Žižek’s advocacy for fidelity to revolutionary truths in light of complex system theory’s understanding of resiliency. It begins with a discussion of how Badiou and Žižek describe truth. Next, it looks at the features that make a complex system resilient. The article argues that if we understand neoliberalism as a resilient system, then the fidelity to revolutionary truths that Badiou and Žižek advocate is not enough, for it doesn’t realize how truths come from the system as a whole. The article concludes by describing how this viewpoint alters discussions of political change.
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Grant J. Silva Racism as Self-Love
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In the United States today, much interpersonal racism is driven by corrupt forms of self-preservation. Drawing from Jean-Jacques Rousseau, I refer to this as self-love racism. The byproduct of socially-induced racial anxieties and perceived threats to one’s physical or social wellbeing, self-love racism is the protective attachment to the racialized dimensions of one’s social status, wealth, privilege, and/or identity. Examples include police officer related shootings of unarmed Black Americans, anti-immigrant sentiment, and the resurgence of unabashed white supremacy. This form of racism is defined less by the introduction of racism into the world and more on the perpetuation of racially unjust socioeconomic and political structures. My theory, therefore, works at the intersection of the interpersonal and structural by offering an account of moral complacency in racist social structures. My goal is to reorient the directionality of philosophical work on racism by questioning the sense of innocence at the core of white ways-of-being.
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Kelly Struthers Montford Land, Agriculture, and the Carceral: The Territorializing Function of Penitentiary Farms
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The Correctional Service of Canada is currently re-instituting animal-based agribusiness programs in two federal penitentiaries. To situate the contemporary function of such programs, I provide a historical overview of prison agriculture in relation to Canadian nation-making. I argue that penitentiary farms have functioned as a means of prison expansion and settler territorialisation. While support for agricultural programming is rooted in its perceived facilitation of rehabilitation and vocational training, I show that these justifications are untenable. Rather the prison farm ought to be viewed as an institution made possible by and that reproduces, settler colonial power relations to animals, labour, and territory. Prison agribusiness is then an expression of colonial, agricultural, and carceral powers.
book reviews
7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Rosa M. O'Connor Acevedo Decoloniality: The Task of Delinking from Multiple Spheres of Colonial Oppression
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Forrest Perry Climate Change and Revolutionary Agency
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Amanda M. Petersen Punishment’s Paradox: The Violent Contradiction of the Penal State
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Gail M. Presbey Exploring a More Inclusive and Pluralistic Sense of American Identity
view |  rights & permissions | cited by