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1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden Editorial Note
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articles
2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Nathan Eckstrand The Crisis of the Humanities and the Viability of Direct Action: Leaving the Academy
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Humanities advocates focus on demonstrating the humanities’ value to encourage participation. This advocacy is largely done through institutional means, and rarely taken directly to the public. This article argues that by reframing the theory of Direct Action, humanities advocates can effectively engage the public. The article begins by exploring three different understandings of the humanities: that they develop good citizenship, that they develop understanding, and that they develop critical thought. The article then discusses what Direct Action is and how it works. The article concludes by describing how to reframe Direct Action to suit the needs of the humanities, including potential actions that will achieve those ends. Humanities Direct Action must be seen as a debate and will focus on increasing critical thinking.
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
John Harfouch Anti-colonial Middle Eastern and North African Thought: A Philosopher’s Introduction
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I argue that while recognition is important for Middle Eastern and North African philosophers in academia and society, recognition alone should not define the anti-colonial movement. BDS provides a better model of engagement because it constructs identities in order to bring about material changes in the academy and beyond. In the first part of the essay, I catalog how MENA thought traditions have been and continue to be suppressed within the academy and philosophy in particular. I then sketch one possible path to better representation in philosophy by reading Fayez Sayegh’s analyses of Zionist colonialism and Palestinian non-being. In the second half of the essay, I argue that BDS is among the premier anti-colonial movements on American campuses today because it is a materialist anti-racist movement. Insofar as that movement is often shunned and prohibited, an anti-colonial society offers a membership in exile.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Tony Iantosca Who We Are Is How We Are: Black Lives Matter at Disciplinary Society’s Breaking Point
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In this article, I explore the contrast between the recent George Floyd protests and the lockdowns immediately prior by situating these rebellions in the context of Foucault’s disciplinary society and subsequent scholarship on biopolitical management. I assert that the disciplinary mechanisms operative in finance/debt, policing and epidemiological management of the virus share similar epistemological assumptions stemming from liberal individualism. The revolutionary character of these uprisings therefore stems from their epistemological subversions of the predictable individual, and this figure’s spatiotemporal situatedness, a construction that helps power make claims on our collective future. The protests push us to see beyond a strict Foucauldian reading of this moment to uncover the metastatic status of identities in rebellion, which sustain resistance to disciplinary society’s epistemological foundations.
symposium
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
José Jorge Mendoza Introduction
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6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Carlos Alberto Sánchez Philosophy after Narco-Culture: A Brief Synopsis
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7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Sergio Armando Gallegos-Ordorica Reflections on Culture, Brutality and Personhood
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8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Manuela Alejandra Gómez Rethinking Brutality: Making Sense of Narcoculture
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9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Carlos Alberto Sánchez The Phenomenology of Brutality: Response to Critics
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book reviews
10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Peter Amato Marx, Property, Possession and Power
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11. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Christopher Davidson Elite Control of Conduct and Affect
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12. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Benjamin L. McKean Our Deluded Demos?
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13. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Alec Stubbs Examining the Sacrificial Economy of Digital Capitalism
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14. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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15. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden, Margaret A. McLaren Editorial Note
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articles
16. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Elisabeth Paquette Autopoietic Systems: Organizing Cellular and Political Spaces
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In Autopoiesis and Cognition (1980), Humberto R. Maturana and Franscico J. Varela state that “the way an autopoietic system maintains its identity depends on its particular way of being autopoietic, that is, on its particular structure, different classes of autopoietic systems have different classes of ontogenies” (98). With this in mind, in this article I develop how this conception of autopoietic systems is both present in, and operates through, Wynter’s employment of space and place, poetry, and wonder.
17. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Cory Wimberly Propaganda and the Nihilism of the Alt-Right
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The alt-right is an online subculture marked by its devotion to the execution of a racist, misogynistic, and xenophobic politics through trolling, pranking, meme-making, and mass murder. It is this devotion to far-right politics through the discordant conjunction of humor and suicidal violence this article seeks to explain by situating the movement for the first time within its constitutive online relationships. This article adds to the existing literature by viewing the online relationships of the alt-right through the genealogy of propaganda. Through situating the alt-right alongside the genealogy of propaganda, the article offers new insights into the social isolation, increasingly extreme social and political positions, nihilism, and violence that have emerged within the alt-right. The article concludes by applying the lessons of the alt-right for online organizing across the political spectrum and argues that a class-based politics of the left is an important part of countering the rise of the alt-right.
18. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Matt York Imagining New Worlds: Revolutionary Love and Radical Social Transformation in the Twenty-First Century
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As we witness the collapse of the neoliberal consensus and the subsequent rise of authoritarian ‘strong men’ and xenophobic nationalisms across the globe, the capitalist hegemony that was consolidated by the neoliberal project remains very much intact. In pursuit of a sane alternative to this post-neoliberal world order this article proposes love as a key concept for political theory/philosophy and for performing a central role in the revolutionary transformation of contemporary global capitalism. Through a close reading of the works of Emma Goldman and Michael Hardt, and specifically their own pursuit of a political concept of love—I draw on, and make links with contemporary ideas of love as a political concept for radical social transformation in the twenty-first century. I argue that new love-based political subjectivities, practices, and group formations offer exciting opportunities for a reimagining of the frame within which an alter-globalisation can occur, and link theory to praxis by introducing an ongoing Collective Visioning project which illuminates a new post-capitalist, post-patriarchal, post-colonial and post-anthropocentric synergetic politics grounded in revolutionary love.
review essay
19. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Ann Ferguson Is Eliminating Gender a Transnational Feminist Solution or a Western Imposition?
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book reviews
20. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Ermanno Castanò Italian Thought and Animality
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