>> Go to Current Issue

Philosophy of Management

Volume 7, Issue 1, 2008
MacIntyre, Empirics and Organisation

Table of Contents

Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-15 of 15 documents


1. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Ron Beadle, Geoff Moore MacIntyre, Empirics and Organisation: Guest Editors’ Introduction
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
2. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Alasdair MacIntyre How Aristotelianism Can Become Revolutionary: Ethics, Resistance, and Utopia
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
3. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Samantha Coe, Ron Beadle Could We Know a Practice-Embodying Institution if We Saw One?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper considers the resources MacIntyre provides for undertaking empirical work using his goods-virtues-practices-institutions framework alongside the attendant challenges of doing such work. It focuses on methods that might be employed in judging the extent to which observed social arrangements mayconform to the standards required by a practice-embodying institution. It concludes by presenting the outline of an empirical project exploring at a music facility in the North East of England, The Sage Gateshead.
4. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Lucy Finchett-Maddock An Anarchist’s Wetherspoons or Virtuous Resistance? Social Centres as MacIntyre’s Vision of Practice-based Communities
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper uses narrative from the social centre movement in the UK to argue that social centres are examples of the MacIntyrean small communities that can virtuously resist the overbearing market influence. Looking at the contrast between rented and squatted centres, the paper argues that those that are squatted are practice-based communities, and those that are rented, are institutions. This therefore highlights the interrupting role of the market and argues that the rented centres are incompatible with MacIntyre’s ideal.
5. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Lee Salter The Goods of Community? The Potential of Journalism as a Social Practice
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper considers the question of whether journalism can be considered to be a social practice. After considering some of the goods of journalism the paper moves to investigate how external goods can corrupt the practice and make it somewhat ineffective. The paper therefore looks to consider ways in which the goods claimed have been better served in ‘radical’ journalism. Bristol Independent Media Centre is then evaluated as an example of an active project in which the goods of community are pursued through an inclusive form of participatory journalism.
6. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Carter Crockett MacIntyre: From Transliteration to Translation
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Despite the profound potential of MacIntyre’s revolutionary virtue paradigm, management scholars have struggled to make sense of one of the most contentious and insightful philosophers of our time. This conceptual paper attempts to move past the transliteration of MacIntyre in favour of a translation of his contribution in a manner than retains something closer to its full meaning, while helpfully guiding empirical efforts to apply this emerging paradigm to modern organisations. This translation entails a dismissal of MacIntyre’s hypercritical bias in order to accommodate an expansion of his ideas into the language and logic of management theory and practice. Schein’s methodological roadmap for deciphering culture is offered, as is theory-building using comparative case research, as offering two particularly promising directions for future empirical studies that seek to use the theory of virtue in order to reconceptualise and study the modern organisation.
7. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
John Dobson Utopia Reconsidered: The Modern Firm as Institutional Ideal
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper challenges Alasdair MacIntyre’s assertion that the modern firm - such as Google, Unilever, or Microsoft - is inimical to human flourishing within an Aristotelian framework. The paper begins by questioning MacIntyre’s rendering of utopian communities. It then addresses four specific criticisms of themodern firm to be found throughout MacIntyre’s oeuvre, namely compartmentalisation, myopia, inequality, and loss of community. Arguments are made to the effect that these criticisms do not vitiate the institutional role of the modern firm in an Aristotelian context. The paper concludes with an invocation of the modern firm as institutional ideal within an evolving utopian vision of human flourishing. This is a utopian vision in which the modern firm plays a constructive, not corruptive, institutional role.
8. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Russell Keat Practices, Firms and Varieties of Capitalism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Against MacIntyre’s view that capitalism is incompatible with the conduct of economic production as a genuine practice, this paper claims that capitalist economies take a number of institutionally distinct forms, and that these differ significantly in the extent to which, and the reasons for which, they are antithetical to production as a practice. Drawing on the extensive literature in comparative political economy on varieties of capitalism, it argues that while ‘Liberal’ Market Economies such as the USA and UK conform quite closely to MacIntyre’s understanding of capitalism, ‘Coordinated’ Market Economies such as Germany and Japan do not. In particular, the industry-based associations of the German model are argued to be highly conducive to the internal goods and standards of excellence central to MacIntyrean practices.
9. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Jeffery Nicholas Eucharist and Dragon Fighting as Resistance: Against Commodity Fetishism and Scientism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper examines two practices – the Roman Catholic Practice of Eucharist and the game Dungeons and Dragons – to show how social critique can be mounted from within a practice. It begins by relating Alasdair MacIntyre’s notion of tradition to his earlier analysis of ideology and to the notion of ideology ingeneral. The paper then tackles two dominant forms of ideology – Commodity Fetishism and Scientism – and shows how both Eucharist and Dungeons and Dragons promote critical thinking to resist those ideologies. In the process, it denies the Althusserian-Foucauldian analysis of ideology as mere materialityand defends a conception of ideology as material and ideal.
10. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Kelvin Knight Goods
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Parts 1 to 3 of this paper explore the theoretical rationale and ethical significance of Alasdair MacIntyre’s twin distinctions between goods internal and external to practices and between goods of excellence and of effectiveness. Parts 4 and 5 then relate this analysis to his critique of contemporary institutions, compartmentalisation and management. My argument is that these concepts express a teleological theory of why and how goods should be ordered which, in refusing to identify practical rationality with institutional actuality and instead differentiating between rival traditions, progresses beyond the theories of Aristotle and of other, past and present anglophone Aristotelians.
reviews
11. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Geoff Moore Review: Dependent Rational Animals
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
12. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Kelvin Knight Review: The Tasks of Philosophy: Selected Essays Volume 1
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
13. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Paul Blackledge Review: Ethics and Politics: Selected Essays, Volume 2
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
14. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Ron Beadle Review: Tradition, Rationality and Virtue. The Thought of Alasdair MacIntyre
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
15. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Peter McMylor Review: Aristotelian Philosophy; Ethics and Politics From Aristotle to MacIntyre
view |  rights & permissions | cited by