Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-20 of 24 documents


articles
1. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 4
Peter H. Van Ness Conversion and Christian Pluralism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Some philosophers argue that a commitment to religious pluralism precludes the affirmation and encouragement of religious conversions on the grounds that decisions to convert are rationally unwarranted and, thus, their encouragement is ethically suspect. I challenge this view; furthermore, I contend that a proper understanding of religious conversion from a Christian and pluralistic point of view requires instead the identification of pluralism’s multiple meanings, i.e., as a descriptive category, a philosophical position, and an ideological construct.
2. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 4
Judson B. Trapnell Bede Griffiths, Mystical Knowing, and the Unity of Religions
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Strict constructivist philosophers conclude that no truth claims can be verified on the basis of mystical exploration due to the thoroughly conditioned character of such experiences. In response, Bede Griffiths’s life of dialogue between Christianity and Hinduism suggests that mystical knowing incorporates both conditioned and unconditioned elements. In the cross-culturally identifiable experience of self-transcendence in meditation, the relationship between the conditioned subject and the unconditioned sacred “object” is transformed, resulting in an intuitive knowledge for which different criteria of verifiability are both needed and available. Griffiths’s multireligious experience thus supports the identification of common ground for various religions in mystical knowing.
3. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 4
Norman Lillegard Philosophers, Theologians, and the Pluralism Problem
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Recently some theologians have argued that philosophical debates about the rationality of religious belief, such as the current evidentialism debate, are theologically irrelevant. For those debates assume the integrity of a particular religious tradition and neither provide a way of choosing between conflicting religions nor any way of sorting through conflicts which are internal to the particular religions (that is, they provide no solutions to “the pluralism problem”). In opposition to these claims I argue that the current evidentialism debate can provide resources which, taken together with Kierkegaard’s stress on subjectivity, enable fruitful discussion of the pluralism problem. I focus on the problem of diversity within a religion, but suggest applications to the problem of many religions.
4. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 4
William O’Neill The Distinctiveness of Christian Morality: A Dispute Revisited
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Theologians differ not merely as to whether, but as to how Christian morality might be distinctive. In this essay, I consider the differing senses of distinctiveness in Christian ethics, i.e., how the predicate “Christian” qualifies the justification of moral judgment; the form, extension, and modal force of moral rules; and the morally relevant description of action in the theological ethics of Karl Barth and Hans Urs von Balthasar, and the “autonomy school” of Josef Fuchs and Bruno Schüller. The essay concludes with an assessment of the distinctiveness of Christian ethics in Iight of the foregoing criticism.
5. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 4
Philip J. Rossi Editor’s Page
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
6. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
James P. Kow Geist: A Systemic Principle of Interiority
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
My discussion of Hegel focuses direcrly upon the process of interiority at the centre of his thought. This process captures certain fundamental classical philosophical and religious themes in its gamut: knowledge, love, the Incarnation, and the Trinity. The central anti-reductionistic principle around which my examination of interioriry is developed is Hegel’s contention that the low or imperfect must be seen in the light of the high or perfect. I discriminate between the different ontological forms of this principle in the philosophies of Aristotle, Aquinas, and Hegel.
7. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Wilfried K. Backhaus Advantageous Falsehood: The Person Moved by Faith Strikes Back
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In Hume’s Of Miracles the person movecl by faith is put in a dilemma between faith and reason . Can one resolve this dilemma as a compleat Humean? The answer is yes. Within the Humean context different approaches can be developed ta overcome Hume’s dilemma. One uses Hume’s theory of utility to defend the belief in the afterlife. The other requires Hume to place faith on a par with beauty and therefore among the passions to which reason must be a slave. Historically there was at least one compleat Humean who was also moved by faith --- Johann Georg Hamann [1730- 1788].
8. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Frank Lucash The Philosophical Method of the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect and its Application to the Ethics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
I argue that we can arrive at a better understanding of the Ethics and why Spinoza wrote it by viewing it through certain ideas expressed in his Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. These ideas are: 1) personal remarks, 2) the method and most perfect method, 3) true ideas, 4) false ideas, 5) definitions.
9. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Lance Byron Richey Spinoza contra Curie
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
I outline Spinoza’s development of the concept of conatus in the Ethics, and attempt to define its role in his metaphysics. In light of this, I critique the theory based on the identification by modern physics of certain radioactive substances, e.g., curium. These substances, I argue, are by definition unstable individuals whose essences include finite durations (half-lives). As such, they are in direct contradiction to Spinoza’s metaphysics. I then advance and critique several defenses Spinoza might make for his theory of conatus.
10. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 3
Philip J. Rossi Editor’s Page
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
11. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Joseph A. DiNoia Nature, Grace, and Experience: Karl Rahner’s Theology of Human Transformation
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The mid-twentieth century stalemate between neoscholastic and progressive theologians can be broken by recovering and reappropriating Aquinas’s fundamental insight about the supernatural. This paper hopes to contribute to this aim by a reading of Rahner’s theology of grace. Rahner is in basic accord with Aquinas in his emphasis on the primacy of uncreated grace and in his conception of the relation of nature and grace, but not with respect to his notion of the experience of grace, with his dependence on the conceptualities of transcendental idealism.
12. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Mary V. Maher Rahner on the Human Experience of God: Idealist Tautology or Christian Theology?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The primary subject of this study is the assessment ofJohann B. Metz’s judgment that Karl Rahner’s transcendental anthropology abstracts from concrete experience and succumbs to a kind of Idealist tautology. Secondarily consideration is given to the broader range of similar criticisms of Rahner’s construal of the God-human relation.
13. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Andrew Tallon The Experience of Grace in Relation to Rahner’s Philosophy of the Heart
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The correct understanding of the concept of heart in Rahner consists in a recognition that the highest performance of a finite spirit comprises affective, cognitive, and volitional consciousness in a functional union that could be called the heart-mind. Rather than privilege cognition and volition and then consider feelings and moods as separate and purely subjective phenomena, we must recognize the intentionality of certain higher affective responses, i.e., those that have become integrated into the highest operational synthesis of a person who is developing as an adult in matters ethical and mystical. The highest actions of such a person are intersubjective faith, love, and hope.
14. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
William M. Thompson Word & Spirit, Hermeneutics & Transcendental Method: Exploring Their Connections in Karl Rahner
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The viabiliry of Rahner’s “transcendental method” in the light of challenges posed by contemporary hermeneutics is explored through an analysis of what Rahner relatively early called “transcendental hermeneutics.” In tum, this is shown to be based upon Rahner’s understanding of how the trinitarian Word and Spirit interrelate.
15. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
John R. Sachs Transcendental Method in Theology and the Normativity of Human Experience
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Transcendental theology is, as a return to the subject, an attempt to take experience seriously, because transcendental method explores the full range of the conditions of the possibility of experience. For Rahner, transcendental theology is theological anthropology. This study explores his method also in relation to transcendental experience of God.
karl rahner society bulletin, january, 1993
16. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Melvin Michalski Karl Rahner Society Bulletin, January, 1993
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
17. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Robert Masson, Andrew Tallon, Ann Riggs Annual Update of Bibliography of Rahner Secondary Literature
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
18. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Editor’s Page
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
19. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Bernard J. F. Lonergan, Roben C. Croken Consciousness and the Trinity
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
20. Philosophy and Theology: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Darrel E. Christensen A Hegelian/Whiteheadian Critique of Whitehead’s Dipolar Theism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
A critique of Whitehead’s conccpt of God from the standpoint of absolute idealism in general and of Hegel and Whitehead’s relation to Hegel in particular.