Cover of Philosophy Now
Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-20 of 3224 documents


editorial & news
1. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Rick Lewis Editorial
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
2. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Anja Steinbauer News
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
3. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Matt Qvortrup Shorts
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Pop songs are usually about variations on the theme of love. But there are exceptions to the rule. ‘More songs about Buildings and Food’ was the title of a 1978 album by the rock band Talking Heads. It was about all the things rock stars normally don’t sing about. Philosophers, likewise, tend to have a narrow focus on epistemology, metaphysics and trifles like the meaning of life. But occasionally great minds stray from their turf and write about other matters, for example buildings (Martin Heidegger), food (Hobbes), tomato juice (Robert Nozick), and the weather (Lucretius and Aristotle). This series of Shorts is about these unfamiliar themes; about the things philosophers also write about.
modern moral issues
4. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Andrew Hyams Recognition & Protest
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Throughout the last decade, social protest movements have filled our TV screens and newsfeeds. From Occupy and the Arab Spring, to the Yellow Vests, Extinction Rebellion, the Women’s Marches and Black Lives Matter, people power is as alive as ever. Sadly, it also remains as controversial as ever, as the media furore over the toppling of statues in the US and UK has shown. This highlights the poor appreciation by many commentators of what drives social protest. If we want mature responses to social movements, we must first consider the points-of-view of those doing the protesting.
5. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Charlotte Curran The Ethics of Fat Shaming
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
There have been attempts to ethically justify fat shaming as being motivated by a desire to achieve a greater good – namely, improved physical health or well-being. These ‘greater good’ arguments assume that the intentions behind fat-shaming are often positive, aiming to inspire individuals to make healthier choices which could contribute to a better quality of life. Although this rationale may intuitively seem correct, let me present reasons why this view is misguided, and why a competing moral demand should take precedence.
6. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Frank Thermitus A Stoic Approach to Racism
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Rather than imagining an ideal world, Stoics try to manage their emotions in order to deal with the world as it is. With this in mind, Stoicism would suggest that people of color should begin each day by reminding themselves, “I will face racism, I will be stereotyped, I will be racially profiled, I will face racial discrimination, and people will be culturally or racially insensitive.”
7. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Elad Uzan Is Election Meddling an Act of War?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In response to foreign interference in elections, warlike language is understandable. As a hostile violation of sovereignty, election meddling fits one technical description of an invasion. However, just war theory, the most influential source of objective guidance for the ethical prosecution of wars, and the philosophical heart of international law concerning war, offers a sobering rejoinder. The theory suggests that, while election meddling is in fact a belligerent act, no actual use of military force could ever be ethically justified as a response.
8. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Gerard Elfstrom Nonhuman Persons
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
For much of Western history, we have been confident that human beings are persons but no other creatures have that status. These beliefs matter because personhood has often been deemed a necessary requirement for possessing moral value. Recently, an American legal activist group, the Nonhuman Rights Project, has challenged the assumption that only human beings are persons. Their approach is simple. They assume that humans possess particular features that make them persons, then ask whether there is evidence that any nonhuman animals display these same qualities. The group has offered testimony from an array of experts to support the claim that chimpanzees, elephants, and dolphins do indeed possess them. They conclude that these animals should legally be considered persons. Although the Project makes claims about legal rights only, and their court suits have so far been unsuccessful, their arguments have implications for more general issues concerning the moral standing of nonhuman animals and their relations to humans. If some animals do have a standing as persons even in the narrow sense required for legal recognition, then we may be morally obliged to treat those animals very differently, by, for example, not killing them for sport or food, or using them for medical experimentation.
fun, poetry & fiction
9. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Guto Dias Philosophers’ Café
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
modern moral issues
10. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
J.Y. Lee, Andrea Bidoli Abortion & Artificial Wombs
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy. In current practice, this involves the death of the foetus. Consequently, the debate on whether those experiencing an unwanted pregnancy have the right to abortion is usually dichotomized as a matter of pro-choice versus pro-life. Pro-choice advocates maintain that abortion is acceptable under various circumstances. The idea that we ought to respect pregnant people’s rights to choose what to do with their bodies – respect for bodily autonomy – is cited as a major reason for granting them abortion rights. Pro-life advocates, on the other hand, claim that abortion is not acceptable under most circumstances. They argue, typically, that the foetus has a right to life. Recent events, such as Poland’s High Court decision in October 2020 to ban most abortions, and the huge protests and outcries this generated around the world, indicate that the abortion debate is far from resolved.
general articles
11. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Karen Parham Deleuze & Guattari’s Friendly Concepts
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Philosophers are friends and creators of concepts. This was certainly the view of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) and Felix Guattari (1930-1992). As they say in their book What Is Philosophy? (1991), “Philosophy is the discipline that involves creating concepts” (p.5). Certainly, no other discipline could have created concepts such as ‘tabula rasa’, ‘language games’ or ‘qualia’, but surely other disciplines have their own concepts? Well, according to Deleuze and Guattari, they do in the sense that they have concepts within a frame of reference – they invent concepts to label things already in existence – but they don’t create the thoughts behind them, as philosophy does.
12. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Sujantra McKeever René Descartes: A Yogi?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
One of history’s greatest philosophers was, by my estimation, also a great yogi. The Frenchman René Descartes (1596-1650) is often called ‘the father of modern philosophy’. He sat in his room and contemplated the mysteries of the mind. Yoga follows the same course to wisdom and understanding.
13. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
James Robinson Reason & Emotion
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The heart and the mind, that is, emotion and reason, are often said to be in opposition. This is not so! This article aims to enhance our consciousness of the connection between the two.
fun, poetry & fiction
14. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Brandon Robshaw John Stuart Mill
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
general articles
15. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Chad Engelland Phenomenology at the Beach
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
At the beach, we soak up some sun, frolic in the surf, and swim with the waves – to name just a few of the activities possible. Apart from doing anything, though, it is exhilarating just to be at the beach. Why? What is the contemplative appeal of that place where the ocean meets the land?
16. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Dean Ericksen Leibniz on Unicorns
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Saul Kripke may have argued that unicorns could not possibly exist, but if you’re personally unconvinced, you’d be in good company. When he wasn’t busy independently inventing infinitesimal calculus and devising his famous theodicy, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) found time to write about unicorns in what would become Protogaea (1749).
regulars
17. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Martin Jenkins Brief Lives: C.S. Lewis
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
C.S. Lewis is today best known as a Christian apologist and the author of the Narnia series of children’s fantasy books, including The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1950). It is therefore easy to forget that his original training, and his first academic post, were in philosophy. That training marked almost everything that he wrote and broadcast.
18. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Thiago Pinho Interview: Martin Savransky
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
fun, poetry & fiction
19. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Melissa Felder Simon & Finn Melissa Felder
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
regulars
20. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Steve Brewer, David Morling, Terry Hyde, Adam Hitchcock, Tom Chamberlain Letters to the Editor
view |  rights & permissions | cited by