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Displaying: 1-10 of 154 documents


1. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
Saulius Geniusas On the Paradox of Perception and the Emergence of the Absolute Consciousness in Husserl’s Phenomenology
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The following investigation addresses the correlation between the given object and its manners of givenness, endorsed by Husserl as the fundamental question of his phenomenology. The essay identifies the origin of this correlation in the paradox of perception as it emerges in the Investigations and proceeds to show how this paradox triggers the emergence of the absolute consciousness in Husserl’s writings on time and Ideas I. Resisting the schematic approaches to Husserl’s work that construe its development in terms of a series of disconnected phases, this essay aims to explicate why Husserl himself considered the correlation between the object and its manners of givenness a theme that provides unity to his lifework.
2. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
Richard L. Lanigan The Phenomenology of Embodiment in Communicology
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Embodiment is a problematic at the center of philosophic and scientific inquiry where issues of ontology and methodology function in apposition to one another in the study of the human mind and body in a socio-cultural world. A comparison is made between Jakobson’s theory of human communication and the logics offered by Merleau-Ponty and Peirce for analyzing the conjunction of semiotics and phenomenology where the thematic is embodied human conscious experience. In the tradition of Merleau-Ponty and Peirce, the validity and reliability of the eidetic analysis is illustrated empirically using the example of vasospasm (impaired motor muscle function with attending sympathetic stimulation) in the medical research of Jurgen Ruesch. Contextual reference is made to the work of Bateson, Bourdieu, Eco, Erikson, Foucault, Kristeva, and Sapir.
3. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
Frank J. Macke Body, Liquidity, and Flesh: Bachelard, Merleau-Ponty, and the Elements of Interpersonal Communication
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This essay seeks to consider Merleau-Ponty’s concept of embodiment from the vantage point of Gaston Bachelard’s poetic reflections on the four elements: earth, wind, fire, and water. More specifically, I intend to interpret Merleau-Ponty’s notion of flesh, as articulated in The Visible and the Invisible, as communicative embodiment, and then I seek to understand the communicological feature of flesh in terms of water and liquidity. The thesis of this essay is that the discourse on “embodiment” that follow in Merleau-Ponty’s wake should, regardless of its classification as “postmodern,” be articulated in terms of the “post-Cartesian” consciousness animated by Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology.
4. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
Paul Majkut MetaTV
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Viewing TV as a totality is obfuscated by attention too closely fixed on autonomous programming. When the attitude of the viewer changes and reveals the larger dimension of the object viewed, a shift from passive reception to active disruption is possible. Television viewers move from program to program, empowered by the remote control, violating and replacing programming temporal restraints intended by producers with an internal time consciousness that is marked by duration rather than chronology. The shift from passive reception to a narrative whose structure is controlled by the viewer is profound. MetaTV is reiterated falsehood and reiteration is the essence of the “big lie,” not an antidote to deception, as Husserl and Stein argue.
5. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
William McBride The Sartre Centenary: Why Sartre Now?
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This essay begins by recalling the fact that 2005 was the centenary of Sartre’s birth and hence the occasion for a number of commemorative conferences. Contrary to the claim of one essayist, to the effect that the participants in such conferences seemed to lack a sense of direction concerning Sartre’s contemporary importance, it is argued that there is considerable such importance, as shown in several of the commemorations attended by the author. This claim is then supported by a consideration of Sartre’s contributions, both original and ongoing, in the areas of phenomenology, ontology, and politics.
6. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
James Mensch Artificial Intelligence and the Phenomenology of Flesh
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A. M. Turing argued that we should draw “a fairly sharp line between the physical and the intellectual capacities of a man.” Traditionally, this has meant disregarding the role flesh plays in our intellectual capacities. Correspondingly, intelligence has been defined in terms of the algorithms that both men and machines can perform. In this essay, I raise some doubts about this paradigm. Intelligence, I argue, is founded on flesh’s ability to move itself, to feel itself, and to engage in the body projects that accompany our learning a language. Th is implies such a sharp line cannot, in fact, be drawn.
7. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
Thomas Nenon Seebohm, Husserl, and Dilthey
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This essay outlines the main themes in Thomas Seebohm’s Hermeneutics. Method and Methodology with particular emphasis on his descriptions of animal and elementary understanding. It closes with some remarks about the relationship between human understanding as a whole and more primitive strata of understanding like animal and elementary understanding, on kinaesthesis, and on the way that various philosophical methods, including phenomenology, can contribute to a comprehensive description and critical analysis of hermeneutics.
8. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
Marilyn Nissim-Sabat The Future of Psychiatry and the Naturalization of Phenomenology
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This essay is a critique of the effort of cognitive scientists to naturalize phenomenology, in particular Husserlian phenomenology, in order to legitimate their investigation into conscious phenomena by integrating phenomenality, presumably in Husserl’s sense, with cognitive science. I show that this effort is misguided because it rests on profound misconstruals of the meaning of phenomenology. In conclusion, I show that Husserlian phenomenology cannot be naturalized because its inaugural act is the de-naturalization of the world.
9. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
François Raffoul Heidegger and Ethics
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The ambition of this essay is to investigate Heidegger’s thought of ethics in terms of what he calls in his “Letter on Humanism” an “originary ethics,” attempting to draw key features or characteristics of such an ethics. I argue that the proper site of ethics is at the center of Heidegger’s enterprise, in which ethics is grounded on a phenomenal basis, as opposed to being left groundless in abstract theorizing on so-called applied and theoretical ethics. Heidegger would think ethics, not as some theoretical principles to apply, but as the very unfolding of human existence.
10. Phenomenology 2005: Volume > 5 > Issue: Part 2
Harry P. Reeder Living Words and Concepts: Semantic Space and Semantic Texture
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An exploration of the active and passive constitution of linguistic and proto-linguistic semantic space in motivated and intersubjective intentional life. ‘Semantic texture’ encompasses ontological and epistemological features of finite, historical, and discursive human life.