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1. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Richard W. Miller

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There has been a conflation by many Catholics of the Church's pro-life teaching with the strategy of overturning Roe v. Wade. In this paper, I argue that there are other ways for Catholics to think about and respond to the tragedy of abortion. First, I argue that there are serious limitations to the present legal strategy of overturning Roe. Second, I tum to social scientific data to describe the conditions that lead to abortions. Third, I argue that the Catholic strategy should be mindful of the limits of the present legal strategy and should bedeveloped in accord with what the social scientific data reveals. Finally, since the multiple factors that lead to abortions demand a complex multi-faceted response, I suggest some ways Catholics should respond to the abortion problem within the Church and the wider political sphere.
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2. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Danielle Poe

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"Mothers' Civil Disobedience"In this paper, I consider how the nonviolent civil disobedience of Molly Rush and Cindy Sheehan reflect the inherent ambiguity of mothering in a militaristic society. First, if a mother says nothing and does nothing about the pervasive militarism in society the very lives of her children (as well as other children) are at risk. But, if a mother speaks out against militarism or commits an act of civil disobedience, she risks scorn and imprisonment that can interfere with, or make impossible much of the work of mothering. Second, part of mothering involves raising children to be socially acceptable, but in a militaristic society that which is socially acceptable is morally unacceptable. Rush and Sheehan use their particular context to successfully challenge U.S. militarism through non-violentcivil disobedience.
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3. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Andrew Fitz-Gibbon

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This paper is a reflection on a personal journey toward nonviolence, and looks particularly at the nonviolent care of children who have been victims of emotional, sexual and physical violence. It analyzes the philosophical threads of praxis, nonviolence and how moral sense is shaped through a triad of affective, reflective and elective experience. It concludes with a MacIntyrean perspective relating to the conjoining of theory and practice in the formation of a robust nonviolent praxis.
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4. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Daniel R. Gilbert, Jr.

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Competition, an experience that human beings construct, is also a challenging concept to teach in a liberal education curriculum. Liberal education is, among other things, a celebration of what imaginative human beings can accomplish together with their differences and their common ground in sight. It is not self-evident, however, that such an ethic of connection, tolerance, and civility canencompass competition. Competition often unfolds as a divisive human experience. Divisiveness among certain human interests is a bedrock premise in the disciplines of economics and strategic management. Frequently, one or both of these disciplines can be found in an undergraduate curriculum alongside liberal education initiatives. The ethical aspirations that we hold for liberal education could be undermined by two disciplines in our very midst.This paper contains a defense of a curricular remedy for this threat to liberal education. With a focus on places, or sites, I create a framework with which we liberal educators can reinterpret competition as the routine practice of an ethic of connection, tolerance, and civility. This focus on sites is augmented when we set our sights photographically on places where competitors necessarily get along with one another. By re-conceiving competition in terms of the places and the sites of human togetherness, I render avoidable the intellectual disconnection between an ethics of liberal education and the divisive concept of competition. We liberal educators can claim competition-intensity, wins and losses, and all-for our educational enterprise.
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5. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Daniel Dombrowski

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6. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Virginia Held

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7. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Gregory S. Gordon

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8. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Ron Pagnucco

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9. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
David M. Barnes

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10. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Joseph Betz

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11. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Valerie Lesniak

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12. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2

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