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Displaying: 1-10 of 17 documents


1. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Editor’s Note
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2. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Maureen H. O’Connell Jus Ante Bellum: Faith-Based Diplomacy and Catholic Traditions on War and Peace
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Several aspects of our post-9/11 reality challenge the relevance, practicality, and international viability of the two primary trajectories of the Christian tradition on war and peace (just war theory and pacifism): the rise of strong religion around the world, the privatization of first-world faith, and an American preference for autonomous reason. This article proposes “faith-based diplomacy” as a constructive middle or third way between what have become dichotomous Christian responses to war and violent conflict, and a response that attends to the challenges of our post-9/11 “signs of the times.” After reviewing recent developments in each trajectory, I suggest that faith-based diplomacy cultivates a series of intentional dispositions and actions that foster peace and seek justice even in the absence of armed conflict. It offers a model of “justice before war” or jus ante bellum that complements the growing edges of both the just war theory and peacemaking by offering several as yet unexplored dispositions and commitments necessary for effective responses to violent conflict.
3. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Andrew J. Pierce Formal Democracy, Structural Violence, and the Possibility of “Perpetual Peace”
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In this paper, I revisit and evaluate Kant’s prerequisites for “perpetual peace,” including the claim, central to contemporary political rhetoric, that formal democracy produces peace. I argue that formal democracy alone is insufficient to address the kinds of deep-rooted structural violence that ultimately manifest interrorism and other forms of direct violence. I claim that the attempt to eliminate structural violence, and so achieve real “perpetual peace,” requires a moresubstantive sort of democracy, of which the United States and the West remain poor examples. It requires a political critique that goes deeper than just thecritique of state power and government action. This paper tries to develop that critique through a conception of structural violence, and of participatory parity asan overarching standard of redress for this type of violence in all of its forms.
focus: education as a human right, part ii
4. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Angela Johnson, Lin Muilenburg, Katy Arnett, Lois Thomas Stover Combating Symbolic Violence in Public Schools
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A decent education is a basic human right. The provision of free, compulsory education in the US attests to a national commitment to this right. However, thecurrent school system is plagued by inequities, including spending less money on schools serving predominantly poor and non-White populations, subjectingstudents of color to harsher punishments, putting non-White students in special education tracks at higher rates, and neglecting students who are not fluent inEnglish. These inequities are taken for granted within the school system, making the inevitable outcome, achievement gaps between White and non-Whitestudents, seem natural and inevitable. Bourdieu calls this process of making arbitrary differences seem natural “symbolic violence.” Two recent federalinterventions, No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top, have the potential to provide tools for combating this symbolic violence. However, each is designedaround flawed premises which inhibit that potential, which we explore in the context of teacher education.
5. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Laurie Brands Gagne The Narrative Approach to Teaching Peace and Justice
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The narrative approach to teaching Peace and Justice attempts to address the division between activists and church-goers that is often found on Catholiccampuses. The former, who advocate for social change, tend to regard religious faith as self-serving, while the latter, who emphasize community service, tend toregard activism as “radical.” By studying the life-stories of individuals whose contributions to the struggle for justice reflect the unfolding of a spiritual journey, students come to see that religious faith can be integral to a life dedicated to social change. Barack Obama’s autobiography exemplifies the youth’s journey to self-acceptance which the theologian John Dunne identifies as the second of the four great tasks of an individual’s life. The stages of this journey involve breaking free of narcissism and what theologian Miroslav Volf calls “embracing” the other.
book reviews
6. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Mark Shiffman E. Jane Doering, Simone Weil and the Specter of Self-perpetuating Force
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7. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Laurie Calhoun Humanitarianism in Question: Politics, Power, Ethics. Eds. Michael Barnett and Thomas G. Weiss
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8. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Clare Heyward Gillian Brock, Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account
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9. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
A. Marco Turk Harry Anastasiou, The Broken Olive Branch: Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict, and the Quest for Peace in Cyprus, Vol. One, The Impasse of Ethnonationalism
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10. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Edwin Martini Wayne Karlin, Wandering Souls: Journeys with the Dead and the Living in Viet Nam
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