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Displaying: 1-10 of 511 documents


1. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Candler Hallman Hope and Temporality in the Irish Long Peace
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Throughout the Northern Irish Peace Process, there has been a conflict over how the state should support those affected by the conflict colloquially referred to as the Troubles. In this paper I use ethnographic research to argue that protest against the peace process is made meaningful through different temporal constructions of hope—what and how individual activists view as the future moral good. Hoping is a cultural and political practice with which individuals orient themselves to one another and to different political events, particularly contests over reconciliation and support payments. Understanding how the act and the ethics of hoping fit into different religious and secular narratives is a way of understanding the complex role of religious belief in giving meaning to political action. This approach also reorients peace activists towards the victim as a future-oriented agent, and not only a subject of past violence.
2. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Sean Byrne, Robert C. Mizzi, Nancy Hansen Living in a Liminal Peace: Where is the Social Justice for LGBTQ and Disability Communities Residing in Post Peace Accord Northern Ireland?
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3. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Binoy Kampmark On ASIO’s Advice: The ‘procedural trap’ and Refugees in Indefinite Detention
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This paper assesses the approach to indefinite detention adopted by the Australian government, suggesting that it is a product of incremental reasoning favouring procedure over observing substantive rights. Specific emphasis is given to the category of detainees deemed to be refugees, but assessed as a pressing security threat. The United Nations Human Rights Committee has found such approaches in violation of international law. Disproportionate measures, it is argued, have been taken regarding such a class of refugees, in direct violation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The trend towards such detention, however, is an international one, a security trend that defers legal judgment to that of the executive in what can be termed a form of governmentality in action. That trend received considerable impetus from the post-September 11, 2001 detention regime in Guantánamo Bay.
4. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
David E. DeCosse The Equality of Freedom and Catholic Public Theology in the United States: The Context of the Question
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5. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Surulola Eke Understanding Oppression, Theorizing its Reproduction, & Forecasting its End
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Oppression is a universal experience even though many agents and targets are oblivious of their roles. The unconsciousness of the oppressed and dominated individuals and some of those who are responsible for their dehumanizing experiences ensure that the phenomenon is unseen, hence unchallenged. Not only does the lack of awareness keep the oppressed submerged in this reality, but also prevents them from seeing how their response to oppression may help to perpetuate the system. Therefore, the first step in breaking the cycle of oppression in which people are entrapped is to walk with the oppressed to a point where their own enlightenment is possible. This walk which will bring the reality of oppression to the consciousness of the oppressed is what will also neutralize the phenomenon’s power of self-reproduction.
book reviews
6. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Emily Sawicki-Barone Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict: Ethical, Legal, and Strategic Implications
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7. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Rand Herz Ecological Politics
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8. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Irina Subotić Humor and Nonviolent Struggle in Serbia
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9. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Jeff Aguiar Peace Education in a Conflict-Affected Society: An Ethnographic Journey
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10. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 27 > Issue: 1
Contributors
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