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Displaying: 1-10 of 22 documents


1. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Craig Hazen Editor’s Introduction
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2. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Walter Schultz A Counterexample Deity Theory
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In his book God and Necessity and in four subsequent papers, Brian Leftow argues against metaphysical theories which hold that “God’s nature makes necessary truths true or gives rise to their truthmakers,” asserting that all such “deity theories commit us to the claim that God’s existence depends on there being truthmakers for particular necessary truths about creatures.” Leftow supports this by arguing that all deity theories entail that if it is untrue that water = H2O, then God does not exist. This paper presents a counterexample deity theory along with a synopsis of its correlative theory of truth and truthmaking.
3. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Gerald K. Harrison What Are Epistemic Reasons?: A Divine Analysis
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Epistemic reasons exist indubitably, yet confusion surrounds just what exactly they are, in and of themselves. In this paper I argue that there is only one thing they could credibly be: the favoring attitudes a god is adopting toward us believing what is true and following methods of belief formation likely to result in true beliefs. As the existence of epistemic reasons is indubitable then if this analysis is correct, it will provide us with an apparent proof of a god’s existence.
4. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
D. T. Timmerman Are Naturalistic Theories of Emergence Compatible with Science?
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Complexity theorist Stuart Kauffman writes Reinventing the Sacred: A New View of Science, Reason, and Religion to defend ontological emergence and refute theism. He argues naturalistic emergentism is the preferable alternative to a naturalistic reductionism that views all reality as reducible to particles in motion. Among the central claims naturalistic emergentists make is that they have built their worldview on the firm foundations of science. In this paper I argue that naturalistic theories of ontological emergence are incompatible with the philosophical preconditions necessary for practicing science.
5. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Paul A. Macdonald Jr., Joel Brown The Problem with Evil
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The problem of evil typically allows the existence of evil to go unchecked. However, in order to be able to press the problem of evil against the theist, the skeptic must offer an account of evil. We examine several of these God-independent accounts and show how difficult it is to define evil without ultimately relying on the metaphysics of value that theism provides. On the other hand, according to the God-dependent account of evil that we endorse, God is logically and metaphysically antecedent to evil. Thus, in either case, the “problem” of evil for the theist can never coherently arise.
6. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Jeffrey Koperski Breaking Laws of Nature
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One of the main arguments against interventionist views of special divine action is that God would not violate his own laws. But if intervention entails the breaking of natural law, what precisely is being broken? I consider the main approaches to laws: Humean reductionism, supervenience on causal powers, the structure of possible worlds, and nomological realism. In the end, I argue that early modern natural philosophers largely had it right. Laws are not created entities or powers that act as intermediaries between God and nature; they are best understood as expressions of God’s will for nature.
7. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Charles Taliaferro Black Lives, Sex, and Revealed Religion Matter!: Contrasting Kantian Philosophy of Religion with Cambridge Platonism
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Kant’s negative, distorted views on black Africans, human sexuality, and revealed religion led him to undervalue the case for racial equality, healthy sexual intimacy, and the virtues of Christianity as a revealed religion with its commending worship, prayer, and rites. Kantian anthropology and critique of revealed religion is contrasted with the more capacious approach of the Cambridge Platonists. Challenging Kant’s methodological bias is important in removing the obstacles facing a fair assessment of matters of race, sexuality, and the virtues of Christianity as a religion based on revelation.
philosophical notes
8. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Chris L. Firestone Can the New Wave Baptize Kant’s Deism?: Maybe
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I contend that Kant’s philosophy, as it stands, is strictly deistic in a strictly epistemic sense, but its own internal theological momentum suggests this epistemic deism may be overcome in the eyes of faith because of ontological considerations surrounding God and God’s work in the world. I sketch six “signposts” in defense of this claim that emerge out of the New Wave. Because these signposts lead directly to two philosophically viable and theologically acceptable roadways for overcoming the charge of deism, I conclude that “maybe” is the best answer to the question “Can the New Wave Baptize Kant’s Deism?”
9. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Nathan A. Jacobs Can the New Wave of Kant Scholarship Baptize Kant’s Deism?: No
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In recent decades there has arisen what Keith Yandell labels the “new wave” of Kant interpretation. These “new wavers” argue that Kant has a more robust view of God and religion than traditionally granted. This article is part of an exchange with Chris Firestone, originally presented at the AAR’s annual meeting, on the question “Can the New Wave Baptize Kant’s Deism?” In what follows, I argue no, contending that the theologically robust Kant of the new wave still builds on a foundation that is fundamentally incompatible with historical Christianity. Thus, Kant’s theology and Christianity can never be brought into harmony.
10. Philosophia Christi: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Bradley N. Seeman Apophatic Theology, Apostles, and Alethic Realism
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In “Idolatry and the End of Apologetics,” I worried that while continental philosophy can aid Christian philosophers and theologians, it can also tempt us toward the “Idolatry of Linguistic License”—an idolatry which sets God so far beyond our words that we deny God’s normative place in the community of speakers while safeguarding our autonomy vis-à-vis God. My essay suggested that some passages in Myron Bradley Penner’s helpful book, The End of Apologetics, might pass too close to the Idolatry of Linguistic License. In Penner’s irenic reply he affirmed that the Idolatry of Linguistic License is a real worry, but protested that I had misread him at several points. This response seeks to continue that irenic tone in a discussion of three points where I still have some questions.