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Displaying: 1-10 of 22 documents


1. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
John T. Ford, c.s.c. Ex Umbris et Imaginibus in Veritatem “From Shadows and Images into Truth”
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articles
2. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Adam Stewart John Henry Newman and Andrew Martin Fairbairn: Philosophical Scepticism and the Efficacy of Reason in The Contemporary Review Exchange
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This essay examines the contrasting conceptualizations of reason in the thought of John Henry Newman and Andrew Martin Fairbairn in their articles published in The Contemporary Review in 1885. This essay articulates both Fairbairn’s charge of philosophical scepticism against Newman as well as Newman’s defense of his position and concomitantly details Fairbairn’s and Newman’s competing notions of the efficacy of reason to provide reliable knowledge of God. The positions of Fairbairn and Newman remain two of the most important perspectives on the role of reason in the acquisition of knowledge about God in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Christian theology.
3. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Robert Saley Two Models of Figural Historiography: Newman and de Lubac
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This essay investigates the problem of reconciling contingent historical facts and immutable dogma in light of two different models of figural historiography, presented respectively in John Henry Newman’s Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine and Henri de Lubac’s Catholicism: A Study of Dogma in Relation to the Corporate Destiny of Mankind. Although Newman and de Lubac’s approaches to history were quite different, they are fundamentally complementary.
4. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Marcin Kuczok Conceptual Metaphors for the Notion Of Christian Life in John Henry Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons
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From the perspective of cognitive linguistics, metaphor is a way of thinking and understanding rather than an ornamental device used for aesthetic purposes.Conceptual metaphor constitutes a natural device for comprehending those areas of reality that exceed what is describable by literal terms, including especially the sphere of religious experiences. The purpose of this essay is to analyze the conceptual metaphors employed by John Henry Newman in the first volume of his Parochial and Plain Sermons (1834) as a way of explaining the transcendental character of the concept of Christian life.
5. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Alexander Miller The Reasonableness of Faith and Assent in Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons and Grammar of Assent
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Among the most overlooked sources for studying Newman’s epistemology are his sermons, particularly his Parochial and Plain Sermons. This essay compares Newman’s sermon “Religious Faith Rational” (1829) and his discussion of “Simple Assent” in his Grammar of Assent (1870), both of which defend faith or assent in daily life; this comparison reveals both a strong influence of the sermons on the Grammar and a shift in Newman’s understanding of the term “faith.”
6. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Michael Keating Professors versus Tutors: Pusey and Vaughan at Oxford
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After Newman’s decision to become a Roman Catholic in 1845, Oxford witnessed a fierce battle over the future of the university: would Oxford remain a Christian and Anglican institution, or would it become a purely national, and secular, endeavor? On the Anglican side, the most weighty protagonist was Newman’s former colleague, Edward Pusey. Among those arguing for a national and secular university was Henry Halford Vaughan. In the early 1850s, Pusey and Vaughan engaged in a written controversy, in which they respectively championed a tutorial and a professorial model of learning. However, the issues at stake were much broader than mere pedagogy, and went to the heart of the nature of the institution as a whole.
sermon study
7. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Vinh Bao Luu-Quang Newman’s Theology of the Economic Trinity in His Parochial and Plain Sermons: 1835–1841
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This sermon-study—a sequel to a previous study of Newman’s theology of the Immanent Trinity, 1829–1834 (NSJ 7/1: 73–86)—examines Newman’s theology of the Trinity in the economy of salvation. Viewing the mystery of the Incarnation as the Revelation of Theologia in Oikonomia, Newman developed a “theology of glorification” and a “theology of within-ness,” which in turn grounded a “theology of Rest and Peace.” Newman’s Trinitarian theology (1835–1841), which was deeply influenced by the Fathers of the Church, was simultaneously his response to the anti-dogmatic Liberalism that rejected Christ’s divinity and so denied the Trinity.
book reviews
8. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Enright, O.S.A. Newman and Truth
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9. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Gerald H. McCarren How Italy and Her People Shaped Cardinal Newman: Italian Influences on an English Mind
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bibliography
10. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Newman Bibliography and General Resources
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