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Displaying: 1-10 of 12 documents


1. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford, c.s.c. “Alas! What are we doing all through life, both as a necessity and as a duty, but unlearning the world’s poetry, and attaining to its prose!”
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articles
2. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
M. Katherine Tillman John Henry Newman: Worldly Wisdom and Holy Wisdom
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After considering the meaning of “wisdom” in the Hellenic and Semitic Traditions, this essay examines Newman’s views about “worldly wisdom” in both a practical and a philosophical sense and then considers “holy wisdom” as contemplative and transcendent.
3. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Brendan Case “Notions” and “Things” in John Henry Newman’s Grammar of Assent
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In discussing apprehension, assent, and inference in his Grammar of Assent, Newman contrasted “notions” and “things”—terms that distinguish knowledge of the abstract and “unreal” from knowledge of the singular and concrete. This essay proposes that Newman’s contrast between “notions” and “things” is an adverbial distinction, qualifying a person’s mode of engagement with the world, rather than an adjectival distinction, qualifying the metaphysical status of particular terms.
4. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
C. Michael Shea The “French Newman”: Louis Bautain’s Philosophy of Faith, Reason, and Development and the Thought of John Henry Newman
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Louis Bautain (1796–1867) has been described as the “French Newman” because of the resemblances between their lives and writings. This essay compares three aspects of the thought of Newman and Bautain: their respective understanding of faith, reason, and development. Both thinkers understood faith and reason in relation to conversion and the realities of life and viewed faith and reason as functioning in tandem with doctrinal development.
5. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford Johh Henry Newman: Conversion as Inference
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This essay examines the complementarity between Newman’s Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864), which provided an autobiographical account of his conversions, and his Grammar of Assent (1870), which described three types of inference—formal, natural, informal—that provide three paradigms for different types of religious conversion.
word studies
6. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Edward Jeremy Miller The Church "Superintends" The University "What, Then, Does Dr. Newman Mean"?
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This word study, prompted by Newman’s statement that the church “superintends” the university, indicates that Newman, both as an Anglican and as a Roman Catholic, used “superintend” and its cognates in a variety of contexts: educational and ecclesiastical, theological and epistemological, as well as personal and parental.
archival studies
7. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Stephen Kelly A History of John Henry Newman's Archival Papers
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This study traces the history of Newman’s personal papers that are archived at the Birmingham Oratory. Newman was the “master archivist” who spent considerable time during the last two decades of his life in assembling his papers. Subsequently, three major catalogues of Newman’s papers were prepared: the first began in 1920, under the supervision of Richard Garnett Bellasis and Henry Lewis Bellasis; a second catalogue was compiled in the mid-1950s by Yale University Library for microfilming Newman’s papers; the third catalogue was compiled by Gerard Tracey in 1980.
sermon studies
8. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Geertjan Zuijdwegt Richard Whately’s Influence On John Henry Newman’s Oxford University Sermons On Faith And Reason (1839–1840)
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In 1839 and 1840, Newman preached four Oxford University Sermons, which critiqued the evidential apologetics advocated by John Locke (1632-1704) and William Paley (1743-1805) and subsequently restated by Richard Whately (1787-1863). In response, Newman drew upon Whately’s earlier works on logic and rhetoric to develop an alternative account of the reasonableness of religious belief that was based on implicit reasoning from antecedent probabilities. Newman’s argument was a creative response to Whately’s contention that evidential reasoning is the only safeguard against superstition and infidelity.
book reviews
9. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Phillip R. Sloan Charles M. Woolf: Darwin, Darwinism, and Uncertainty
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10. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
John Henry Newman: A Brief Chronology
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