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1. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Kevin Mongrain, Ph.D., Celeste Barker Bright, Ph.D.

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2. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Keith Beaumont

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Newman was keenly aware of the challenge posed to Christians by the development of historical biblical criticism in the nineteenth century. In several of his Anglican writings—most notably in no. 85 of Tracts for the Times, in unpublished notes and drafts dating from 1861–1863, and in two essays published in 1884—he attempted to resolve questions regarding the nature of biblical “inspiration,” the respective roles of the divine and human “authors,” and the nature of biblical “truth.” This article, originally a paper given at the 2012 conference of the Association française des Amis de Newman on Newman et la Bible, was first published in French in Études Newmaniennes no. 29 (2013).
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3. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Pedro A. Benítez

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Personalist philosopher Maurice Nédoncelle was known for his role in reintroducing John Henry Newman to the French public at a time when it was well needed. Nédoncelle’s merits consist mainly of presenting Newman as a religious philosopher and of drawing attention to Newman’s implicit philosophy. Nédoncelle’s interpretation of Newman is discussed here.
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4. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Christopher Cimorelli

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In this article, I investigate Newman’s understanding of doctrinal development, specifically regarding the accumulation of doctrines over time. Through an analysis of Newman’s essay on development and a letter written by him in 1868, we can better understand the potential “advantage,” but not superiority, that comes from the everincreasing resources of tradition. Newman’s view of development is directed toward the present and abiding concern to maintain fidelity to the deposit of faith, or to what he understands to be a “sacred philosophy.”
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5. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Mary Jo Dorsey

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6. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1

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7. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1

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