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1. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
About
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2. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Kenneth L. Parker Editor’s Welcome
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3. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Editorial Board
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4. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Newman’s Manscripts Enter the Digital Age
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5. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
NINS’ Expanding Range of Affiliations and Collaborative Ventures
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articles and essays
6. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
M. Katherine Tillman A Tribute to Fr. Marvin R. O’Connell
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7. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Marvin R. O’Connell Newman and the Irish Bishops
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8. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
John F. Crosby The Personalism of John Henry Newman as Interpreted Through the Personalism of Karol Wojtyla
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I use concepts of Karol Wojtyla’s personalism, especially the concept of subjectivity, to explain Newman’s personalism. There is a “turn to the subject” in Wojtyla, and there is a similar “turn to the subject” in Newman; and they explain each other. Thus Newman’s distinction between the theological intellect and the religious imagination, and his particular concern with the latter, is shown to be an expression of his personalism. I try not only to throw new light on Newman’s personalism, but also to explain why his personalism, as Wojtyla’s, has been mistaken for subjectivism. I show that there is in Newman, as in Wojtyla, a unity of subjectivity and objectivity that secures his thought against subjectivism.
9. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Javier Sánchez-Cañizares Cognitive Inhibition and the Conscious Assent to Truth: A Newmanian Perspective
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When must a specific cognitive habit be called upon to solve a problem? In the subject’s learning process, “knowing-to” is connected with a conscious particular judgment of truth or “aha” moment enacting a new behavioral schema. This paper comments on recent experiments supporting the view that a shift from automatic to controlled forms of inhibition, involving conscious attention, is crucial for detecting errors and activating a new strategy in complex cognitive situations. The part that consciousness plays in this process agrees with its philosophical description as “judge of truth”, and can thus be regarded as an essential precursor to the development of higher cognitive habits. In this regard, John Henry Newman’s explanation of human assent to truth, for which our consciousness of self is always prior, proves to be decisive.
10. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Fr. Peter M. J. Stravinskas Cardinal Newman and Pope Francis: Catholic Schools as Key to an Educated Laity
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When people hear the name of Cardinal Newman, one of the first associations they make is to his Idea of a University. However, it is rarely known that his first love was Catholic education at the elementary and secondary levels, so that the Oratory School he founded has been described as the “apple of his eye.” Interestingly, Pope Francis is the first pontiff in modern history, at least, to have taught high school (chemistry and Latin) and who has reflected extensively on his own personal experiences of being raised by the Salesian Fathers in Argentina. Both Newman and Francis would regard Catholic elementary and secondary schools as essential to producing what Newman repeatedly referred to as “an educated laity” – equally essential for what St. John Paul II dubbed “the new evangelization.”