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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Colloquy
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
William L. Saunders, Jr. Washington Insider
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essays
3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
William E. May Proxy Consent for Nontherapeutic Experimentation
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4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Rev. Benedict M. Guevin, O.S.B. The Use of Methotrexate or Salpingostomy in the Treatment of Tubal Ectopic Pregnancies
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5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Bethanne Smith, R.N. A Kantian Analysis of Embryonic Stem Cell Research
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Stem cell research is undeniably valuable and has generated excitement in the scientific community because of its potential use in developing new therapeutic treatments for chronic and debilitating diseases. Many researchers believe that the development of new human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines is necessary for success in this research forum. A review of hESC research based on the four principles of biomedical ethics—autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice—reveals areas of ethical conflict. Specifically, the ethical principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence conflict with the destruction of human embryos in hESC research. Two other ethical approaches that may also be used to evaluate hESC research are the utilitarian and Kantian perspectives. Human embryonic stem cell research demonstrates a divergence from morality because persons (embryos) are treated as means rather than as ends in themselves. Using adult stem cells for research is a viable option that does not pose ethical concerns and yet answers the duty of beneficence that a moral obligation to humanity demands. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7.1 (Spring 2007): 257–262.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Steve Kellmeyer Embryo Adoption: A Form of In Vivo Organ Donation?
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articles
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Rev. Martin Rhonheimer The Contraceptive Choice, Condom Use, and Moral Arguments Based on Nature: A Reply to Christopher Oleson
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8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Thomas K. Nelson, M.D. A Human Being Must Be a Person
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9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Antoine Suarez, Matthias Lang, M.D., Joachim Huarte DIANA Anomalies: Criteria for Generating Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Without Embryos
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Ethical concerns are motivating the search for alternative methods to obtain pluripotent stem cells without destroying human embryos. The supporters of these methods stress the importance of ensuring that the biological entities used in these alternative methods are not “disabled or sick human embryos.” In this article the authors argue that biological entities bearing anomalies or alterations that directly inhibit the appearance of neural activity (DIANA anomalies) share the moral status of human organisms fulfilling the clinical criteria for brain death. By contrast, in the absence of DIANA anomalies, the moral status of a person cannot be denied. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7.2 (Spring 2007): 315–335.
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10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
William B. Hurlbut, M.D., Robert P. George, Markus Grompe, M.D. Seeking Consensus: A Clarification and Defense ofAltered Nuclear Transfer
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notes & abstracts
11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
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12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Journals in Science
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
John M. Travaline, M.D., F.A.C.P. Medicine
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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Journals in Medicine
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor, Ph.D. Philosophy and Theology
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Journals in Philosophy and Theology
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Dissertations
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book reviews
18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
William E. May, Ph.D. Health Care Ethics: A Catholic Theological Analysis, 5th edition, by Benedict M. Ashley, O.P., Jean K. deBlois, C.S.J., and Kevin D. O’Rourke, O.P.
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19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Greg F. Burke, M.D., F.A.C.P. Let Me Go to the Father’s House: John Paul II’s Strength in Weakness, by Stanislaw Dziwisz, Czeslaw Drazek, S.J., Renato Buzzonetti. and Angelo Comastri
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Lee Ann Doerflinger On Marriage and Family: Classic and Contemporary Texts, by Matthew Levering
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