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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Colloquy
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton, M.A., Ph.D. In This Issue
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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Monsignor Jacques Suaudeau, Jean-Marie Le Mene, Jose-Maria Simón Castellvi Announcement: Choosing the Stem Cells of the Future
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4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Richard M. Doerflinger Washington Insider
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essays
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Daniel Avila Sexual Difference and Marriage: An Urgent Need for New Studies
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Most governments worldwide recognize marriage as the union only of man and woman. Especially in Europe and North America, however, there is growing support for legalization of same-sex marriages. The impending shift in marriage policy posits the supposed insignificance of sexual difference. There is thus a need for comprehensive reflection on the essential substance of sexual differences, and on the legal and social relevance of sexual complementarity. Defendersof traditional marriage must be prepared to offer reasons why society must continue to recognize sexual difference as a fundamental attribute of marriage,argued in terms that carry authority and meaning in today’s post-Christian ethos. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.3 (Autumn 2009): 441–446.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Bishoy Dawood Engineering Immortality through Human Cloning: A Christian Theological Perspective
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This paper discusses the topic of engineering immortality, which is used as an ethical argument in support of human cloning. While many of the legal and religious responses to the ethical issue of human cloning focus on the use of embryos as a means to an end (for reproductive or therapeutic purposes) and onthe concern for human dignity, an argument for achieving human immortality through human cloning has rarely been considered. This paper presents, from a Christian theological perspective, a response to the argument for engineering immortality by human cloning. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.3 (Autumn 2009): 447–451.
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Rev. Benedict M. Guevin, O.S.B. Augmentation Mammaplasty for Male-to-Female Transsexuals: A Case Study for Catholic Hospitals
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The author explores whether Catholic hospitals should be required by law to perform augmentation mammaplasty on male-to-female transsexuals. The case involves a male-to-female transsexual who presented at a Catholic hospital for breast augmentation surgery. The hospital refused and was sued on the basis of aviolation of the Unruh Civil Rights Act. The hospital formulated a policy on how to deal with such cases in the future. It determined that the same standards thatapply to any woman be applied here, since the mammaplasty was not part of the actual transgender surgery. The author argues that augmentation mammaplastyis part of the transgendering process and illicit for a Catholic hospital to perform. Legislation protecting Catholic hospitals from having to perform abortions shouldbe expanded to include transsexual reassignment surgery in all of its stages. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.3 (Autumn 2009): 453–458.
articles
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
E. Christian Brugger Symposium on Dignitas personae
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The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, under the prefecture of Joseph Ratzinger, published its instruction Donum vitae in 1987 to provide moral guidance on bioethical issues. Since 1987, many new ethical issues have arisen, especially in the areas of regenerative medicine (which includes stem cellresearch) and assisted reproduction. To address these the CDF, under the prefecture of William Levada, published the bioethical instruction Dignitas personae inDecember 2008. The present symposium includes reflections on the strengths and weaknesses of the new document by six moral theologians noted for theirwork in bioethics: Christian Brugger, John Finnis, Luke Gormally, Christopher Kaczor, William E. May, and Peter F. Ryan, S.J. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.3 (Autumn 2009): 461–483.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
J. Daryl Charles My Criminal Brain Made Me Do It: Biogenetics and the Loss of Moral Responsibility
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10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Rev. Martin Rhonheimer Natural Law and the Thomistic Roots of John Paul II’s Ethics of Human Life
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John Paul II broadly dealt with the topic of natural law, particularly in Veritatis splendor: natural law is a law proper of man created as a free and rational being, whose reason, participating in the divine and ordaining reason, is able to develop a normative function of discernment of good and evil. Already as a professor in Lublin, Pope John Paul II had proposed such a genuinely Thomistic, that is, non-naturalistic, concept of natural law which recognizes both human reason as the measure of morality and the spiritual-bodily unity of the human person. John Paul II’s encyclicals Veritatis splendor and Evangelium vitae propose a coherent treatment which unites his teaching on natural law, a corresponding conception of the object of the human act, and their application within the ethics of life concerning three great themes: the direct killing of an innocent, abortion, and euthanasia. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.3 (Autumn 2009): 517–539.
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11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Christopher M. Gacek Conceiving Pregnancy: U.S. Medical Dictionaries and Their Definitions of Conception and Pregnancy
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notes & abstracts
12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Journals in Science
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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Greg F. Burke, M.D., F.A.C.P. Medicine
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Journals in Medicine
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor, Ph.D. Philosophy and Theology
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Journals in Philosophy and Theology
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book reviews
18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Michael E. Allsopp Suffering and Dignity in the Twilight of Life edited by B. Ars and E. Montero
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19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Brendan Sweetman Body-Self Dualism in Contemporary Ethics and Politics by Patrick Lee and Robert P. George
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 3
Stephen Napier Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics by Neil C. Manson and Onora O’Neill
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