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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Colloquy
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Edward J. Furton, M.A., Ph.D. In This Issue
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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
William L. Saunders Jr. Washington Insider
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essays
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Joseph K. Woodard Retreat of Christian Love: Benedict’s Deus caritas est Revisited
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The underlying problem addressed by Pope Benedict XVI’s first encyclical is how the modern state usurped and perverted the Church’s charitable enterprises. The Church invented public schools, hospitals, and family services and ran them for a millennium as the “better half” of Christendom’s aristocratic, oligarchic, and democratic regimes. Beginning in the sixteenth century, however, and culminating in today’s social justice movement, the Church’s institutions of discerning love have been supplanted by political agencies, operating on the basis of universal and homogenous justice. This robbed the Church of its visible moral authority, metastasized the political administration, and corrupted both the charity and its recipients. Fortunately, those political agencies are now collapsing, and the Church must again step into the breach. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.4 (Winter 2009): 659–669.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Debra R. Hanna, R.N. The Moral Burdens of Biotechnology: One Nurse’s View of Patient Decision Making
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Biomedical devices and biotechnological treatments are different types of health intervention. In general, biomedical devices, such as deep brain stimulators implanted for treatment of movement disorders, can help patients without imposing moral burdens. Biotechnological interventions, on the other hand, require the use of biological substances, which are often obtained by the destruction of human life or unusual tampering with it, as in embryonic stem cell research, cloning, and fetal tissue transplantation. Biotechnology imposes a moral burden on patients, who may not fully understand what it involves and the effects its use might have on them later. This essay is a reflection on the serious losses patients experience before they consider biotechnological options and on their sense of moral burden after they have consented to their use. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.4 (Winter 2009): 671–679.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Patrick Guinan, M.D. Autonomy Has Not Killed Hippocrates
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The Hippocratic tradition in medicine was declared to be over a generation ago. Classical medicine with the time-honored doctor–patient relationship was deemed paternalistic. Autonomy, in large part because of the Belmont Report of 1979, was ascendant. A new academic discipline, bioethics, was to replacemedical ethics. The patient would be free of paternalism, and health care would not look back. But it has not worked out that way. It seems that where life-threatening disease is concerned, a patient cannot be truly autonomous. Bioethics has a role in health care, but the Hippocratic tradition and its doctor–patient relationship remain at the heart of medical ethics. This tradition has served mankind well for twenty-five hundred years and is anything but dead today. Modern society would do well to acknowledge and respect the Hippocratic tradition. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.4 (Winter 2009): 681–688.
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Denis A. Scrandis A Demonstration of the Personhood of the Human Embryo
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Determining the personhood of the human embryo is critical to advancing an informed and reasoned public policy debate over abortion and human embryo research. Many defenders of life—the Vatican included—have withheld recognition of the personhood of the embryo in order to avoid making an explicitly philosophical statement. This essay considers current embryological evidence from a philosophical (i.e., Aristotelian-Thomistic) point of view. This essay also addresses certain contemporary and antithetical philosophical biases. A demonstration then shows that the embryo is the fully formed human person’s initial stage of development consisting of a rational soul that possesses the power of intellect and a commensurate body that is capable of developing into the fully formed human person. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.4 (Winter 2009): 689–693.
articles
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
John S. Howland, M.D. A Defense of Assisted Nutrition and Hydration in Patients with Dementia
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Nutrition and hydration are common problems in advanced dementia. There has been growing opposition to the use of tube feeding in these patients both in and out of the Catholic Church. This article takes a critical look at current medical research on the subject and presents a vigorous defense of the use of artificial nutrition and hydration in dementia. A revealing case study is presented and a clear medical and ethical rationale are offered to support the appropriate use of ANH in accord with Church teaching. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.4 (Winter 2009): 697–710.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Christopher Gross Karol Wojtyla on Sex Reassignment Surgery: An Application of His Philosophical Anthropology
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Sex reassignment surgery raises a number of ethical questions. This article examines a few of these questions through the lens of Karol Wojtyla’s philosophical anthropology. The author maintains that the operation is based on a dualistic view of the person and a distorted understanding of the human capacity for self-determination. In his work, Wojtyla emphasizes the inseparable connection between freedom and truth, and he argues that the person is a unity of body and spirit, so that the body cannot be reduced to mere matter. Therefore, the author concludes that sex reassignment surgery must be seen as morally illicitin light of Wojtyla’s anthropology. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.4 (Winter 2009): 711–723.
10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Thomas K. Nelson, M.D. The Revelation of Personhood
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The foundation of bioethics is the dignity of the human person. The concept of personhood developed from Christian Revelation. The marks of personhood include individuality, substantiality, rationality, incommunicability, and relatedness. Relevant issues for bioethics include the reality of personhood, the inseparability of human nature from human personhood, and the import of personhood for the inviolability of every human being. The recent bioethical instruction, Dignitas personae, reasserts that the embryo should be treated as a person and contains a latent philosophical argument for defining the embryo as a person. The struggle to conceptualize personhood is the effort to value every human being as the image and likeness of God, who is ineffably Triune in his Personhood. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9.4 (Winter 2009): 725–736.
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11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Helen Alvaré, E. Christian Brugger Health Care Proposals Pending Before Congress: Ethical Questions a Catholic Should Ask
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notes & abstracts
12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Journals in Science
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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
John M. Travaline, M.D., F.A.C.P. Medicine
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Journals in Medicine
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Christopher Kaczor, Ph.D. Philosophy and Theology
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Journals in Philosophy and Theology
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book reviews
18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
W. Malcolm Byrnes Darwin’s Gift to Science and Religion by Francisco J. Ayala
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19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Katherine Helming, Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Neonatal Pain: Suffering, Pain, and Risk of Brain Damage in the Fetus and Newborn edited by Giuseppe Buonocore and Carlo V. Bellieni
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 9 > Issue: 4
Michael E. Allsopp By Their Fruits: Eugenics, Population Control, and the Abortion Campaign by Ann Farmer
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