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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Lawrence Masek, PhD Colloquy
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Furton, MA, PhD In This Issue
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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
William L. Saunders, Jr. Washington Insider
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essays
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Christopher Dodson Catholic Doctrine on Food, Creation, and the Human Person
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Kevin Murphy’s essay “Christians and the New Food Movement” (Autumn 2011) rightly warns about introducing non-Christian ideas associated with certain environmental movements into church practices. However, the essay embraces several errors that ultimately conflict with the Catholic faith. Catholic social doctrine, rooted in the universality of Christ’s salvific act, requires viewing food, agriculture, and the economy through a moral lens. A refusal to engage in such issues because they might bring the Church into contact with heterodoxy leads to a form of protectionism that embraces a reductionist view of creation and, ultimately, the human person. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12.2 (Summer 2012): 217–226.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Cory Andrew Labrecque In the Image of Dust and Heaven: The Resurrection in Religion, Science, and Bioethics
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The Resurrection, like many other fundamental elements of the Christian Creed, stands outside the province of empirical science. If something that constitutes a mainstay feature of a person’s belief system cannot be measured by the standard tools and methods of the day, does this make it any less credible? Does immeasurability require a radical reformation of our understanding of the objects and principles of faith in order that they become more accessible to the reach of contemporary science, or does their immeasurability discount them altogether? This essay reflects on James Carroll’s rejection of the bodily resurrection of Jesus and its implications for Roman Catholic bioethics. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12.2 (Summer 2012): 227–234.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Christine Cimo Hemphill, MD, Kathryn Karges, MD, Sr. Renée Mirkes, OSF Reducing Uterine and Ovarian Mortality Risks of Religious Sisters: A Critique and Counterproposal
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Consecrated women religious have been shown to be at increased risk for uterine and ovarian cancers. The authors critique a proposal by Kara Britt and Roger Short advocating the distribution of a combined oral contraceptive to women religious as a way of reducing this risk. The authors argue that the proposal is seriously flawed: the data it references attenuate its conclusion, the execution protocol is incomplete, and the proposal fails to address the serious health risks of combined oral contraceptives. As a counterproposal, the authors recommend that women religious be taught to monitor their gynecologic health by charting their menstrual and ovulatory cycles. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12.2 (Summer 2012): 235–239.
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Helen Watt Cooperation and Immoral Laws: Preventing without Prescribing Harm
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In responding to an unjust legal situation involving human rights abuses, one approach is to seek a selective ban on some abuses if a more comprehensive ban is not feasible politically. While such an approach to embryo research or abortion, for example, can reasonably be applied, much harder to defend is regulation—that is, giving permission or instructions for others to do or prepare to do what we believe is morally wrong. Regulation necessarily involves us in wrongly intending that others choose wrongly, that is, in formal cooperation with evil. We should choose other means of making a bad situation better: selective banning or discouragement by, for example, withholding funding, and the mandating of acts that are good or potentially good in the context in which they are mandated. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12.2 (Summer 2012): 241–248.
articles
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Jason T. Eberl Religious and Secular Perspectives on the Value of Suffering
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Advocates of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide argue that a patient’s intractable pain and suffering are a sufficient justification for his life to end if he autonomously so chooses. Others hold that the non-utilization of life-sustaining treatment, the use of pain-relieving medication that may hasten a patient’s death, and palliative sedation may be morally acceptable means of alleviating pain and suffering. How a patient should be cared for when approaching the end of life involves one’s core religious and moral values, particularly concerning whether pain and suffering can have some sort of instrumental value. The author reasons why a patient who is terminally ill can find his suffering valuable for both religious and nonreligious goals. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12.2 (Summer 2012): 251–261.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Rev. Kevin Belgrave, Rev. Pablo Requena, MD A Primer on Palliative Sedation
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The use of sedation at the end of life is proving a difficult topic of bioethical debate. In spite of efforts to reach agreement on definitions and guidelines, the practice most commonly known as palliative, or terminal, sedation remains a source of ambiguity and confusion. The goal of this article is to offer the reader a primer on the topic of palliative sedation. Two specific objectives are proposed: first, to orient the reader to some of the principal elements of the clinical and bioethical literature on palliative sedation; and second, to describe what we believe to be some of the principal sources for a theological understanding and evaluation of the use of sedation at the end of life. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12.2 (Summer 2012): 263–281.
10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Patrick C. Beeman, MD Catholicism, Cooperation, and Contraception
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A Catholic physician practices in a world that condones the use of contraception. In the effort to be morally consistent, Catholic physicians are faced with questions about the extent to which their participation in providing contraceptives constitutes immoral cooperation in evil. Particular challenges face resident physicians, who practice under attending physicians and within the constraints of local and specialty-wide training requirements. The author examines the nature of the moral act of referring for contraception and argues that, in limited cases, there is a moral distinction between a referral and an intra-residency patient transfer, and the latter may be morally licit according to the principle of material cooperation. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12.2 (Summer 2012): 283–309.
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11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput A Thread for Weaving Joy
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notes & abstracts
12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Science Abstracts
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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Deacon John M. Travaline, MD, FACP Medicine
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Medicine Abstracts
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Philosophy and Theology Abstracts
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book reviews
18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
William C. Mattison III The Promise of Christian Humanism:Thomas Aquinas on Hope by Dominic F. Doyle
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19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Rev. Richard Benson, CM Biblical Natural Law: A Theocentric and Teleological Approach by Matthew Levering
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Daniel P. Maher Medical Ethics: Sources of Catholic Teachings, 4th edition edited by Kevin D. O’Rourke, OP, and Philip J. Boyle
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