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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton, MA., PhD. In This Issue
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Colloquy
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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Richard M. Doerflinger Washington Insider
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essays
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Edmund F. Haislmaier The Complexities of Providing Health Insurance
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Societies have an obligation to ensure that their citizens have access to health care, but there are disagreements over how this system should be structured. The most contentious issue centers on the morality of specific therapies or actions. In this essay, the author examines the influence of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on private employer health plans. He concludes that the Church’s teaching on the inherent dignity and worth of every human life should be the guiding principle for assessing the relative merits of differing approaches to constructing a comprehensive and equitable system for financing and delivering medical care. The patient’s conscience should be primary. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13.3 (Autumn 2013): 419–426.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Rev. Stoeppel Anthony, Rev. Pablo Requena, MD Organ Donation Is Not Mutilation: The History of an Erroneous Idea
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The moral debate on living-donor organ transplantation (LDOT) historically focused on how to overcome the problem of the mutilation inherent in such a medical operation. In time, theologians began proposing justifications of LDOT that assumed that “mere removals” did not constitute mutilation. The example of mutilation as an “intrinsically evil act” in Veritatis splendor would seem to have closed the debate. Nevertheless, many theologians continue to address LDOT as a question of justifying a mutilation. The authors provide a brief summary of the major contributors before and after Veritatis splendor to show that confusion still exists, and then propose new approaches to help resolve this important bioethical issue. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13.3 (Autumn 2013): 427–436.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Thomas Finn Social Science and Same-Sex Parenting
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It has become a commonly accepted claim that children of homosexual parents fare as well as children of heterosexual parents. The author investigates the social science research to establish the accuracy of this claim and discovers sampling errors, invalid comparison groups, questionable outcome measures, and insufficient power. The author then examines a study by Mark Regnerus, which finds that children are most likely to succeed as adults if they spend their childhood with their married mother and father. The only scientifically proven conclusion that can be reached is that children who are raised by their married biological parents have the healthiest developmental outcomes. Claims that outcomes for children of same-sex parents are no different from outcomes for children of married parents have not been scientifically proved. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13.3 (Autumn 2013): 437–444.
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Robert L. Kinney III, PharmD The Duty of the Homosexually Inclined Physician: Disclosure before Care
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The last several years have been marked by a seemingly increasing numbers of individuals with homosexual inclinations. There are consequences to society-wide increases in disordered dispositions, and this paper presents one such consequence. Patients often enter the physician–patient relationship basedon the physician’s “sexual preference.” In order to avoid sexual misconduct from a physician, patients often choose physicians that are not inclined to be sexually attracted to the patient. It is often assumed that a patient can infer a physician’s sexual inclinations by his or her gender, but this is not the case. Due to the inability to determine a health care professional’s “sexual preference” by their gender, a physician has a duty to disclose this information prior to care. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13.3 (Autumn 2013): 445–450.
articles
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
John Skalko If Food and Water Are Proportionate Means, Why Not Oxygen?: Comparing Food and Water by Tube to the Use of Ventilator Support
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Providing food and water, even by tube, is in principle an ordinary and proportionate means of preserving life. The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith made that clear in its August 1, 2007, statement on the matter. However, a pressing question remains: What about oxygen? Food and water are necessary for life. Is not oxygen equally necessary? So why did the CDF not also declare the use of a mechanical ventilator to be in principle an ordinary and proportionate means of preserving life? Conversely, if the use of a ventilator is extraordinary means, then why is the artificial provision of food and water proportionate means? Is there an inconsistency here? The author argues that there is not. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13.3 (Autumn 2013): 453–467.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Vince A. Punzo Alzheimer’s Disease, Tube Feeding, and Prudential Judgment
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The rate of individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to increase significantly in the coming decades. As more attention is paid to end-of-life care for these patients, questions about the use of assisted nutrition and hydration will become more prevalent. Two recent articles that discuss the use of ANH in patients suffering from advanced Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. The author argues that Pope John Paul II’s designation of medically assisted nutrition and hydration as “ordinary care” does not alleviate the ethical necessity of discerning the benefits and burdens of the procedure for these patients. He argues that tube feeding of patients with advanced Alzheimer’s disease should be considered extraordinary, non-obligatory treatment, but future research is still needed to assess the objective and subjective criteria for making this judgment. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13.3 (Autumn 2013): 469–482.
10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Matthew Heffron Providing Health Care to Patients against Their Will
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Obtaining a patient’s informed consent to treatment is an ethical, legal, and professional requirement based on the defense of human dignity. In some cases, however, a government may mandate treatment for patients without their consent if their failure to obtain treatment could endanger the common good. Such a need may arise, for example, in public emergencies, with cases of tuberculosis, and with patients who have mental health issues. May a Catholic health care professional or institution ethically provide treatment to patients who resist or refuse it? The author replies with a qualified yes. Legally mandated treatment may be given without a patient’s consent so long as the treatment is necessary to protect the lives of others, it is limited strictly to what is necessary to protect others, and the principle of subsidiarity applies. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13.3 (Autumn 2013): 483–498.
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11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Pope Francis Address to a Meeting Organized by the International Federation of Catholic Medical Associations: September 20, 2013
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notes & abstracts
12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Science Abstracts
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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Greg F. Burke, MD Medicine
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Medicine Abstracts
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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notes & abstracts
17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Philosophy and Theology Abstracts
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book reviews
18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Rev. Robert E. Hurd, SJ, MD A Century of Eugenics in America: From the Indiana Experiment to the Human Genome Era edited by Paul A. Lombardo
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19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Nicholas Tonti-Filippini Chimera’s Children: Ethical, Philosophical and Religious Perspectives on Human Experimentation edited by Calum MacKellar and David Albert Jones
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 13 > Issue: 3
Katarina Lee Consistently Opposing Killing: From Abortion to Assisted Suicide, the Death Penalty, and War edited by Rachel M. MacNair and Stephen Zunes
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